Undergraduate Admissions

International Students Find a Home for the Holidays

The Thanksgiving and Christmas breaks are an exciting time of year for Scranton students. Many have not been home in a while, and the end of the semester means a lot of stressful tests and project due dates. Thanksgiving break alleviates this time of stress and refreshes students before Dead Week and finals. After the semester, most students are able to go home for the long winter break to prepare and relax before the spring semester.

Although most students have the privilege of going home for the Thanksgiving break to celebrate and spend time with family, international students typically stay in Scranton. 

“These students stay around Scranton to either catch up with school work, do some short distance travel, do some Black Friday shopping, sleep in and chill and hang out with friends,” Director of Global Education, Huey Shi Chew, said.

Some international students get invited to homes by their friends to Thanksgiving meals, and if they do not, the Office of Global Education tries to match students with host families.

“Since last year, the Office of Global Education tries to match the international students who are NOT traveling, with host families, during the holidays. The Office sees this as a win-win situation for the international students and the host family. The international students get to experience an important American holiday and the host family in return, gets to experience and learn from the international guest about his/her culture,” Shi Chew said.

Soccer and Field Hockey Landmark Conference Champions Head to NCAA Tournament

Both the women’s soccer and field hockey teams won the Landmark Conference Championship this past weekend. Next up for both teams: the NCAA tournament. Women’s soccer has been in the tournament the past few years, but this is the field hockey team’s first appearance in it since 1997.

The teams are excited to perform on this stage with such a high level of competition. As a member of the field hockey team, I know that it is such an honor to be in the NCAA tournament bracket, and my teammates feel the same way.

“It’s an honor to be playing in the tournament. It is such a cool experience, and it’s so exciting to be hosting the first game on our home field,” said Nicolette Keale ’20, captain of the field hockey team.

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Panel Reminds Students to ‘Fail Forward’

On Wednesday, Nov. 6, the University held its inaugural Fail Forward Panel for faculty, staff and students. The panel featured Christine Black, J.D., Bobby Davis, Ph.D., Michael Fennie, Ph.D. and Billie Tadros, Ph.D. They were vulnerable in sharing their stories of adversity, failure and resilience to the 300-person audience.

Often times people only share the good in their lives. This panel acknowledged the bad to help others understand that they are not alone in their struggles. In addition, the panel’s shared stories were great examples of how failure can lead to success.

“If we are willing to be authentic with one another, sharing our struggles and not just our joys, we are able to develop more meaningful connections which can sustain us through challenging times in our lives,” Dean Lauren Rivera, a moderator on the panel, said.

Sometimes failures can feel like the end of the world, especially for students. The Center for Health Education and Wellness (CHEW) set up “Fail it Forward” boards around campus for people to share their failures with the school community. This public display helped students come to the realization that they are not alone, and that everybody fails at some point in their life. The responses on the boards ranged from sleeping through classes and failing exams to car accidents and tripping in public.

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Celebrating First-Generation Students in the University Community

The University of Scranton celebrated National First-Generation College Day On Nov. 8. 

Trivia: Michelle Obama is a First-Generation student.

The event took place on Second Floor DeNaples from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The National First-Generation College Celebration recognized Royals who are the first in their families to complete a four-year degree. Twenty-two percent of the undergraduate student body at The University of Scranton are first-generation students.

“This event serves to celebrate the successes of all first-generation students. It also shows how many first-generation students there are on campus, while also highlighting notable figures who are first-generation students, like Father Pilarz and Michelle Obama,” Robert McGowan, THR1VE Program Coordinator, said.


The THR1VE program organized this celebration. The University launched THR1VE last year to benefit first-generation students, as the program seeks to celebrate and support those who identify as first-generation college students.
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Club Spotlight: Anime Club

To continue our Club Highlight series, we are taking a look at the Anime Club at The University of Scranton.

“Our mission is to create a friendly space for students to watch and discuss anime. We attempt to cater to both long-time fans as well as newcomers with an array of shows and discussion topics,” said Anime Club president James Ruff.

The members of the club vote each week to decide on the genre of the week. The club then meets weekly on campus to watch the first episodes of three series of that genre.

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Conversation with a First-Year Student

Coming to a new school to a new campus full of new people, living situations, classes, schedules and more can be stressful. Being a first-year student can prove to be a difficult adjustment no matter where what college you choose.

We spoke with first-year student Morgan Hughes about how the transition and overall first-year experience has been at The University of Scranton.

“As most people can expect, the first week was very overwhelming and stressful because you’re walking into an entirely new routine surrounded by people you’ve never met. However, there are so many other students that completely understand what you’re feeling, and there are so many people that are willing to check up on you and talk about your experiences, whether it’s your RA, someone in the counseling or advising center, or even just someone you pass when walking around campus,” Hughes said.

Hughes, who is an occupational therapy major, found that the workload seemed a little intimidating at first.

“For me, one of the most difficult parts was receiving a full syllabus in each class because, for the first time, I was seeing every exam date and deadline for the entire semester at once,” Hughes said.

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