Delicious Places to Eat in the Scranton Area

By Zoë Haggerty
If you plan to enjoy any of the activities suggested in last week’s blog, you’re sure to work up an appetite–but don’t worry, because we’ve got you covered! Scranton is home to some delicious and unique dining locations, from diners to ice cream parlors to international cuisine. Dig in!
Brunch, Lunch, or Munch:
Downtown Deli
A short walk from The University of Scranton campus on Spruce Street, this popular dining location offers all-day breakfast (french toast for lunch? Yes please!) as well as a salad bar and deli menu. With sandwiches like The Spruce Street and burgers like The RailRider, this sit-down restaurant in Scranton is great for both breakfast and lunch! (**Top photo from breakfast at Downtown Deli!)
Glenburn Grill & Bakery
Located in Clarks Summit, PA, this family-owned and family-friendly cafe is just a short drive from campus. Baked goods, such as homemade pies, nut rolls, and cookies, are made daily, and you can’t go wrong with any of the generously portioned breakfast or lunch options!
Mansour’s Market
This old-fashioned eatery and coffee shop on Prescott Ave offers baked goods and breakfast items, as well as various sandwiches, salads, and burgers. Highly recommended by one of our tour guides, Mansour’s brunch menu is a must try while you’re in town!

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December 7

Each week, our campus correspondents are out and about taking photos and collecting stories for Campus Corner. Read their articles and highlights below! Browse photos on Flickr.

Please note that Campus Corner will be on hiatus through the holiday and intersession, but we’ll be back on Feb. 8!


Surviving Dead Week

By: Megan Castaldi

With the semester coming to a close, students are working hard to write papers, do projects and prepare for final exams.

The University of Scranton tries to help students with the stress of finals by offering activities to “de-stress.” Some of these things include free back massages, coffee, smoothies and free stress balls!

“Dead week is a stressful time, but there are many things Scranton has to offer to de-stress, like the back massages! There is always such a big line to get them done,” said student Gia Salsido.

The library was filled at all hours of the day and night last week, while the rest of campus remained quiet.

First-year students Amy Kaiser said, “I was at the library all day on Wednesday. This is my first finals week, so I am eager to do well on them.”

Thank you for a great semester and we wish everyone the best of luck on their final exams!

(Follow us on Snapchat at univofscranton to see our stories — one of which is about Dead Week!)


It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas

By: Kayla Johnson

Sunday brought forth the official beginning of the Scranton Christmas season with the lighting of the campus Christmas tree, a candle-lighting ceremony and Advent Mass.

Mass led into the serene candle lighting celebration — hundreds of candles glowing in the dim light of the Byron gym. Students processed outside to the soothing hymn of “Silent Night.” Voices rose together to sing the melodic tune and emphasized the familial atmosphere present here at Scranton. Gathered around the tree, the crowd awaited the highlight of the night — the tree lighting. The tree loomed overhead (after recovering from a spill earlier last week), the star on top soon to be as bright as those in the sky up above.

University President Kevin P. Quinn, S.J., said his final words once the University rendition of “Silent Night” was over. Anticipation built throughout the crowd. And, suddenly, the University of Scranton Christmas Tree was as bright as ever, illuminating the night — the beacon and center of campus Christmas spirit.

Check out more photos from the event on our Facebook page or on Flickr.

Have a wonderful holiday!

November 23

Each week, our campus correspondents are out and about taking photos and collecting stories for Campus Corner. Read their articles and highlights below! Browse photos on Flickr.

Please note that Campus Corner will be on hiatus next week, but we’ll be back on Dec. 7!


Women’s Basketball Team Looks Forward to Season

By: Megan Castaldi

As 2015-16 Landmark Conference Champions, The University of Scranton’s Women’s Basketball team has high hopes for their upcoming season.

To kick off the 2016-17 season, the Lady Royals came out victorious over Mount Union with a score of 70-36 at the Chuck Resler Invitational.

Captain Sarah Payonk is a senior. “We had a great start out of the Rochester tournament 2-0. We have a lot of room for improvement as a team and hope to continue to improve and grow as a team,” she said.

Even though a couple of valuable players graduated, the team still looks to have a successful season.

“We have a good mix of young and old this year,” said Payonk. “We have some very talented freshmen stepping into major roles on the team, and have some incredible, well-accoladed players back. I think that we’re still building chemistry with this team but have a lot of potential this season.”

The team was pleased after the Landmark Conference released its 2016 Women’s Basketball Preseason Poll foreseeing the Lady Royals winning the Conference Championship again.

“Our team goals are to win our conference and to hopefully win a national championship,” said Payonk.

To learn more about the Women’s Basketball Team, click here.


A Sunday in the Life of Professor Strain

By: Kayla Johnson

Jack Strain, Ph.D., leads a busy life – five kids, teaching at The University of Scranton and writing his books (he’s currently working on one). Whether he’s watching his students battle it out during a debate in Logical and Rhetorical Analysis, teaching how to pitch a product in his Art of the Pitch class, working on one of his several books or running errands with his wife and children, he’s on the go. This is why Prof. Strain believes (very strongly) in using Sundays to get some must needed rest, surrounded by his family.

Take a look at how Professor Strain spends a typical Sunday at home:

Rise and Shine:

So, we get up around 8 or so and make a simple breakfast because my wife makes a huge delicious spread on Saturday mornings. Coffee is an absolute must, but not without some fresh bagels or doughnuts. I always like to take a look at the Sunday paper as well and catch up on my current events.

No Days Off:

Afterward, I try to work on some grading or work for an hour or two on my latest novel, Patton’s War, which I am trying to churn out before the summer comes.

Football Fanatics:

I am a big football fan, so during the fall and winter Sunday afternoons are devoted to watching my Philadelphia Eagles with my sons.  My wife, Julie, loves football too, but – sadly – is a huge Steelers fan.

Most Amazing Meal of the Day:

Both my wife and I believe in a big traditional Sunday dinner with the whole family.  Luckily for the kids and me, Julie does most of the cooking.  She is an amazing cook, so Sunday dinners include big roasts, stews and even Turkey dinners that she decides to whip up as a special surprise for everyone.

Prepare for Monday:

Nighttime is spent getting lunches made, kids squared away for school the next morning, then my wife and I like to chill out on the couch and watch an episode or two of whatever TV series we are powering through. This year we finished off “Homeland,” “Billions,” “House of Cards,” “The Americans” and now are working through “Shameless.”

Family Time:

With five kids and two demanding careers, life moves fast during the week but Sundays are about family and making time so my wife and I can relax, recharge our batteries and make “us” time whenever possible.

October 19

What I did for Fall Break

By: Kayla Johnson

After the stress of midterm exams and papers, Fall Break was much needed. I was looking forward to some rest and relaxation in the comfort of my home. I got home that Friday afternoon and was instantly greeted by my puppy; he’s a Yorkie named Cooper. It was easy to get back into my routine at home, playing around with my dog and hanging around with my sisters, Brianna and Hailey, and catching up with my ultimate best friend — my mom.

I finally got to see my best friend, George (who I’ve known since I was 5), we talked about anything and everything, like we always do. We binge watched all of the Star Wars movies and downed every kind of candy — maybe too much candy (especially gummy bears, my personal favorite).

My next stop was my grandmother’s house, where I was served up some delicious, homemade Italian pasta with her original marinara sauce paired with meatballs and garlic bread. The perfect meal. It was a basic family night surrounded by my favorite people sharing laughs and never-ending jokes — something I look forward to whenever I come home.

Although it may not seem like much, this Fall Break was everything I needed — a nice amount of relaxation balanced with seeing some of my favorite people. I always look forward to some time to myself without the pressures of schoolwork, but, I also can’t wait until I can come back and see all of my friends. No matter where I am, I always have so much to look forward to and I couldn’t be happier about it.

By Megan Castaldi

Fall Break is one of the most anticipated breaks that we have at The University of Scranton. It is the first break of the year, so I am always eager to go home to visit with my family and any of my friends who may be home as well.

This Fall Break I did not go anywhere exciting or do anything crazy, but rather relaxed and appreciated my time at home. I got to see some of my friends from home, celebrate my sister’s 22nd birthday, watch my brother’s soccer game and bake a bunch of cookies with my grandma.

My grandma loves to bake, so it was nice to do something with her that she really loves doing; she also makes the best cookies you’ve ever had, so that’s an added plus.

The combination of all of these small things made for a very enjoyable Fall Break for me. It was nice to get a break from doing schoolwork and to hang out and enjoy the fall season with family


A Night at the Iron Furnaces: Scranton Bonfire Festival

By: Kayla Johnson

Scranton Bonfire FestivalThis past Saturday, Scranton’s historic Iron Furnaces hosted the sixth annual Bonfire festival. The Bonfire Festival acts as a fundraiser for the Anthracite Heritage Museum and explores the roots of Halloween in good, old-fashioned Celtic style.

Other autumnal festivals and Northeastern Pennsylvania’s industrial history are brought to light and celebrated through the Bonfire Festival. This year’s festival featured tarot card readings, fire twirlers, a Jack-O-Lantern contest, face painting, fire hooping, a balloon artist, stilt walking, a Day of the Dead ofrenda, a fairytale demonstration and plenty of hands-on activities sponsored by the Everhart Museum. There was live theatre, dance performances by Symmetry Studio, a Harvest Display by the Greenhouse Project at Nay Aug Park and — last but not least —the amazing ceremonial lighting of the bonfire.

All were encouraged to come dressed in their Halloween costumes and enjoy the historic site. The crowds enjoyed the activities as the furnaces acted as a picturesque backdrop.

Read more about the bonfire, here!


Step into Reality: The Poverty Simulation

By: Kayla Johnson

This past Friday, the Campus Ministries’ Center for Service and Social Justice hosted the Poverty Simulation, an exercise that allows students to explore what it’s like to struggle to survive with only the bare minimum on a month-to-month basis. The purpose of the simulation is to open the eyes of more than 80 students to the daily battle low-income families deal with, whether it’s being on welfare, attempting to get their next meal or finding child care for children.

“I did this in order to gain a greater insight as to what the real world could be like . . . good or bad,” said Adrian Laudani, a junior who participated in the Poverty Simulation.

The simulation took place in DeNaples and introduced a host of students to the severity of living an impoverished life in this country. The students assumed the roles of more than 26 families facing the harsh reality of poverty. Some of those 26 families are newly unemployed, others are homeless, while some may be senior citizens receiving disability as well as trying to raise their grandchildren. The job of the “families” is to supply basic necessities and decent housing during the course of four weeks lasting 15 minutes.