DPT Alumni Reflect on Benefits of Community Based Learning

CBL trip to Guatemala

Maureen Taylor, Sammy Marri, and a local PT working on standing endurance with a child at the Gualan Nutriction Clinic.

“As the community based learning coordinator for the Physical Therapy Club for the 2016-2017 school year, I have learned immensely about the different opportunities that exist for students to volunteer within the surrounding community. Throughout the school year, the Physical Therapy Club provides exercise classes to three of the local senior living facilities and two of the local day cares. Seniorcise is an exercise class that occurs twice a week for 60 minutes while Kidercise is once a week for 60 minutes. These exercise classes are a great way for students to interact with the community & be creative in the exercise classes. In addition, the club assists in coordinating a Wheelchair Basketball Tournament for I AM organization & a Volleyball Marathon for Cystic Fibrosis as well as volunteering at the Leahy Clinic. The Leahy Clinic is run by students and provides physical therapy services to the uninsured in the surrounding area. While volunteering at the clinic, students are able to gain knowledge within the field.  There are two service trips available to PT club members: Navajo Indian Reservation & Guatemala. On the Navajo Indian Reservation, students partake in service including cleaning, organizing, painting, & assisting in the care of children at a local school as well as immerse in the Navajo culture.  In Guatemala, through Hearts in Motion, students provide physical therapy care to various communities. There are many other options for community based learning for students. Many students volunteer at the local soup kitchen, weight training for athletic teams, dog shelters, & Challenger Soccer. Challenger Soccer is a program at Riverfront Sports Complex for children with special needs who want to participate in sports and be a team member. I am very happy to been given this opportunity, and one of my favorite parts is learning how much our help is truly appreciated by the community.”

“This past January I was very fortunate to have had the opportunity to attend a service trip in Guatemala with some of my classmates. While there, we provided physical therapy services throughout different towns and clinics to those who were in need. We went to help them but what we came back with was far greater. We learned about their wonderful culture, caring people & their vast sense of gratitude & kindness.  I, along with my classmates, will always cherish the memories that I have of the nine days that we spent in Guatemala giving ourselves to others & I know that our lives have been forever changed.”

Maureen Taylor, DPT Class of 2018


CBL tripi to St. Michaels, Arizona

(Left to Right): Bow Arrow, DPT class of 2017, Cassie Lucke, Lisa Jackowitz, and Danielle Frank, DPT class of 2019, at the Window Rock Navajo Tribal Park and Veteran’s Memorial in Window Rock, AZ, the capital of the Navajo Nation.

“During my time on the Navajo reservation my outlook on life and on my future career as a Physical Therapist changed forever.  The humility and gratitude shown among the Navajos, and their ability to share immensely with outsiders has impacted me greatly.  I look forward to learning more about the Navajo culture in hopes that one day, when licensed, I can return and provide the reservation with medical care through the integration of modern medicine and traditional Navajo teachings.”

-Danielle Frank, EXSC ’16, DPT Class of 2019


Learn more about the DPT program at The University of Scranton.

Only a Few Exist, and We Have One!

Did you know there are only approximately 100 pro bono PT Clinics in the country? Of those 100, only 38 are student-run. The PT Clinic in the Leahy Center for the Uninsured and Underinsured is one of those 38!

Partnering with the Community to Make the Connection between the Classroom and the Clinic

Mission Statement:

The mission of the University of Scranton’s Leahy Community Health and Family Center Physical Therapy (LCHFC PT) Clinic, as a part of the University’s first student run free clinic, is to deliver exceptional patient centered care by providing physical therapy services to uninsured and underinsured residents of the University Area Community, educate future physical therapists through clinical learning experiences grounded in the Jesuit tradition, and to foster the partnership between The University, its students, faculty and staff, and the community through collaboration and evidence based practice of physical therapy.

What We Do:

The management of the clinic is run by a team of students from the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program and treatment of patients is conducted by DPT students with supervision by DPT program faculty and licensed physical therapy clinicians from the community.  This provides our students with an valuable hands-on learning experience that enriches both their lives and and the lives of their clients.

Student-Run:

The management of the clinic is run by a team of students from the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program and treatment of patients is conducted by DPT students with supervision by DPT program faculty and licensed physical therapy clinicians from the community.  This provides our students with an valuable hands-on learning experience that enriches both their lives and and the lives of their clients.


Visit the Clinic’s web page here.
Learn more about the DPT program here.

 

Connecting Physical Therapy Education with the Community

Our Physical Therapy students have the irreplaceable advantage of gaining hands-on, real experience right on our campus. By partnering with the community, Scranton makes a strong connection between the classroom and the clinic.

Mission Statement:

The mission of the University of Scranton’s Leahy Community Health and Family Center Physical Therapy (LCHFC PT) Clinic, as a part of the University’s first student run free clinic, is to deliver exceptional patient centered care by providing physical therapy services to uninsured and underinsured residents of the University Area Community, educate future physical therapists through clinical learning experiences grounded in the Jesuit tradition, and to foster the partnership between The University, its students, faculty and staff, and the community through collaboration and evidence based practice of physical therapy.  

What We Do:

The University of Scranton’s Leahy Community Health and Family Center Physical Therapy (LCHFC PT) Clinic strives to provide quality physical therapy screening, examinations/evaluations and interventions to the uninsured and underinsured members of the community at no cost.

The management of the clinic is run by a team of students from the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program and treatment of patients is conducted by DPT students with supervision by DPT program faculty and licensed physical therapy clinicians from the community.  This provides our students with an valuable hands-on learning experience that enriches both their lives and and the lives of their clients.

Learn more about the Physical Therapy program at the University of Scranton here.

Leahy clinic 2.jpg

Hours, Location and Phone Number:

The Leahy Community Health and Family Center Physical Therapy Clinic is located on the bottom floor of McGurrin Hall. The address is 230 Kressler Court, Scranton, PA.

The LCHFC PT Clinic is open Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:00-6:00 P.M. For appointments, please call (570) 941-6563.

DPT Students Share Exciting Research Nationally

Thirty-Four University of Scranton Doctor of Physical Therapy (D.P.T.) students presented research at the American Physical Therapy Association’s Combined Sectors Meeting in Washington, D.C., in January and four D.P.T. students will present their research at the Novel Physiotherapies and Physical Rehabilitation Conference in London in August. The students conducted the research and made the poster presentations with seven physical therapy faculty members, who served as their advisors.

 

At the January conference, D.P.T. students Omar Amer, Scotch Plains, New Jersey; Berta Carmo, Parsippany, New Jersey; Dannylyn Manabat, Long Beach, California; and Jonathan Mayes, Dublin (PA) presented “The Effects of Blood Flow Restriction Therapy on Physical Performance in Adults as Compared to Standard Physical Exercise and Control Groups: A Systematic Review.” Their research was conducted with faculty advisor Peter Leininger, Ph.D.

D.P.T. students Megan J. Manzo ’16, Shelton, Connecticut; Colleen E. Smith ’16, Moscow; Emily M. Suchocki ’16, West Wyoming; and Gianna M. Vitolo ’16, Denville, New Jersey; and faculty advisor Dr. Leininger, presented “Effects of Combined Skilled Aquatic and Land Based Therapy Compared to Land Therapy Alone on Balance and Gait in Adults after a Stroke: A Systematic Review.”

D.P.T. students Stephanie Klug ’16, Morresville, North Carolina; Molly Loftus ’16, Mount Carmel; and Stephanie Zaccaria ’16, Oradell, New Jersey; and faculty advisors Dana Maida, D.P.T., and Janette Scardillo, D.P.T., presented their study “The Effects of Early Mobility in Reducing Length of Stay for Adult Patients in the Intensive Care Unit Due to Trauma: A Systematic Review.”

D.P.T. students Kevin Whelan ’16, Bronx, New York; William Wilcox, Exton; and Alissa Zajac ’16, Oxford, New Jersey, presented “How Is Graded Exercise Testing Being Used in the Clinical Management of Individuals Following a Concussion: A Systematic Review.” Their research was conducted with faculty advisor Dr. Scardillo.

D.P.T. students Danielle Frank ’16, Scranton; Sarah Kosik ’16, Pittston; Courtney Jo James Medfield ’16, Massachusetts; and Krista Ziegler ’16, Scranton, presented their study “The Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Balance and Mobility in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review.” Their research was conducted with faculty advisors Nicholas Rodino, D.P.T., and Renee Hakim, Ph.D.

D.P.T. students William Cavanaugh, Plains; John Huller ’16, Hicksville, New York; Nicholas Mullery ’16, Clark, New Jersey; and Joseph Pichiarello ’16, Dumnore, presented “The Impact of Home Health Care on Cost Effectiveness Compared to Other Post-Acute Settings in Individuals Status Post Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review” Their research was conducted with faculty advisor Tracey Collins, Ph.D.

D.P.T. students Lauren Bonitz ’16, Endicott, New York; Megan Fasano ’16, Blue Bell; Meghan Goyden, Endwell, New York; and Caroline Segota ’16, Floral Park, New York, presented their study “Effectiveness of Gait Interventions in Improving Gait in Adults with Ataxia: A Systematic Review.” Their research was conducted with faculty advisor Jennifer Schwartz, D.P.T.

D.P.T. students Maria Gentile ’16, Jefferson Township; Cassandra Lucke ’16, Archbald; Shannon McSherry ’16, Carmel, New York; and Devin Ryan, Blackwood, New Jersey, presented “The Effect of Equine Related Therapy on Physical and Psychological Well-Being of Older Adults: A Systematic Review.” Their research was conducted with faculty advisors Dr. Schwartz and Dr. Maida.

D.P.T. students Levi Haldeman, Lehighton; Lisa Jackowitz ’16, Moosic; Aaron Oquendo ’16, Wanaque, New Jersey; and Matthew Wells ’16, Hillsborough, New Jersey and faculty advisor Dr. Hakim, presented “The Effects of Intramuscular FES on Objective Gait Measures in Adult Patients with Chronic Stroke: A Systematic Review.”

In addition, Dr. Hakim and University graduates Cassandra Fitzgerald ’15, D.P.T.’18, Fairfield, Connecticut; Elizabeth Palladino ’15, D.P.T.’18, Howell, New Jersey; andSean Scully ’15, D.P.T.’18, Sewell, New Jersey, presented their study “Functional Outcomes of Patients with Orthopedic Diagnoses Receiving Pro Bono Physical Therapy Services in a Student-Run Clinic: A Retrospective Study.”

Poster presentations of research studies were also made at the Washington, D.C., conference by faculty members, including Dr. Maida and Barbara Wagner, D.P.T., faculty emerita, and Heidi Bockelkamp, D.P.T., market director of rehabilitation services at Regional Hospital of Scranton, presented their studies “Determining AM-PAC  ‘6-Clicks’ Cutoff Scores based on Type of Joint Replacement to Predict Discharge Destination” and “Determining AM-PAC ‘6-Clicks’ Cutoff Scores based on Patient Age to Predict Discharge Destination Following Elective Joint Replacement.”

The American Physical Therapy Association’s more than 100,000 members include physical therapists, physical therapist assistants and students of physical therapy.

In addition, D.P.T. students Jamie Christensen, Branchville, New Jersey; Maura McGowan ’16, Scranton; Lindsay McGraw ’16, Lakewood; and Cory Piening, Horsham, will present “The Effect of Virtual Reality Training on Balance and Mobility in Adults with Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review” at the Novel Physiotherapies & Physical Rehabilitation Conference in August in London. Their research was conducted with faculty advisor Dr. Hakim.

Story originally shared in Royal News.

PT and Primary Care: Should they be Linked?

Take it from Bill Boissonnault, PT, DPT, DHSc, FAPTA, executive vice president of professional affairs at APTA – Physical Therapists could make a very strong career in primary care. See some of what he has to say below:

“That ‘primary care culture’ starts in DPT programs, where students are being trained to provide that necessary broad level of service,” he says. “Students get academic grounding in differential diagnosis and medical screening necessary for patient triaging responsibilities.” Boissonnault adds, however, that “the more exposure students can get to primary care models during their clinical rotations—as in the VA model—the better, so they can see this type of care delivery in action and be fully appreciative of the possibilities and opportunities that exist for PTs in primary care.”

The bottom line, Boissonnault says, is that primary care presents “a huge opportunity for physical therapists, the profession, and the health system in terms of producing better care outcomes, ensuring optimal utilization of resources, and decreasing costs. There’s a gap in the provision of primary care that PTs are the best-trained providers to fill.”

Check out the full story from the American Physical Therapy Association’s PT in Motion.

APTA is an individual membership professional organization representing more than 100,000 member physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, and students.

Visit our website to learn more about the DPT program at The University of Scranton!