Graduate Education

Graduate Education

Opportunities Abroad Boost DPT Education


Matthew Aiken (MA) ’17, DPT expected 2020, and Erin Ciarrocca (EC) ’18, DPT expected 2021, reflect on their experiences doing service in Guatemala during intersession.

Where are you going on your service trip/how long?

MA: Our service trip took place in Guatemala over the course of 10 days. Specifically, we stayed in Zacapa and Antigua.

In a paragraph or two, describe your experience and what kind of service you did.

MA: Our service trip was based out of Hearts in Motion (HIM) an organization that provides various medical services to individuals throughout Guatemala. This trip specifically focused on physical therapy. Our group consisted of three groups of physical therapy students from the following Universities: Marquette University, William Carey and The University of Scranton.

Each day we traveled to neighboring towns and provide physical therapy in either a pre-existing clinic or in a “pop-up” clinic. While at the clinics we would treat various types of patients ranging from poor posture causing pain to patients with much more severe and involved neurological issues. Each day we would attempt to work in different groups of students from different schools in order to grow and learn from one another.

What inspired you to go on a service trip?

MA: I was inspired to go on this service trip by various people. Some of my friends have attended previous trips similar to this one and have given it remarkable reviews. Furthermore, I knew for a while that I wanted to take part in some type of service trip, this trip specifically resonated with me because it was a chance to both help other people while continuing to grow as a person and as a student in the physical therapy society.

What is your biggest takeaway from this experience?

MA: My biggest take away from the service trip would be the hospitality and the thankfulness each and every patient expressed. No matter how small of an issue we treated, every patient was grateful. This hit close to home for me because I feel that in our society we can sometimes get so caught up in our everyday lives and ignore what is directly around us. In addition, this trip has shown me how complacent we can become in our everyday lives if we don’t live to help others.

EC: I was most awestruck by the gratitude each patient demonstrated for the care we provided. Often patients would hug and kiss us at the end of their treatment, offering a “Dios te bendiga,” which translates to “God bless you” on their way out of the clinic. As a first-year student, I initially questioned my ability to truly help these patients, but I found that their willingness to listen and learn along with a pure determination to better their own lives was so much stronger than my insecurity. They welcomed my knowledge with open arms and embraced any treatments we offered without skepticism. This type of open-mindedness and faith in the goodness of others was unlike any I had seen before and it was something I would like to model in my future career as a physical therapist.


5. What advice would you give to college students interested in participating in a service trip?

MA: Do it! If there is an opportunity for you to go on a service trip, especially if the service is something you are passionate about, then I highly recommend taking the leap of faith and going for it. If you have concerns about the trip reach out to individuals who have previously attended or a moderator of the trip. We are lucky enough that our school runs numerous service trips that can cater to all types of needs. These opportunities are not always present after we graduate. Therefore, I strongly encourage, even if just a small part of you wants to take part in a service trip, go for it.

EC: My advice is simple — go for it! I decided to go on this trip with only a few days’ notice, no idea who else was going, and relatively low confidence in my ability to treat Spanish-speaking patients, but within just a couple hours of working in the clinic found that the opportunity was just what I needed to grow as a student. I didn’t plan on utilizing my Spanish much, but I was immediately thrown into translating so my comfortability speaking with patients increased each day. I was able to learn from my peers and the professors, which gave me a whole set of new tools to take back for classes this spring. More importantly, this service trip gave me a chance to share the blessings I’ve been given as a University of Scranton student with people who haven’t been afforded the same opportunities. I was able to carry out my mission as a physical therapist, but also as a Christian, in serving and loving God’s children.

6. Do you think you’ll continue to serve in some way after you graduate?

MA: Yes. I am already thinking about ways to continue serving both here in the United States and abroad. Since I was young, I have felt a need to help others, hence a degree in physical therapy. Over the past six years at Scranton, this calling has only grown stronger. The Jesuit ideal of men and women for others has become not just a saying, but, rather, a lifestyle that I look forward to continuing.

View more about Erin Ciarrocca’s trip to Guatemala here!

Check out a faculty perspective here!

Learn more about the DPT program here.

Use Your Career to Reduce Stress for Others

How Does Therapeutic Behavior Management Relate to Business?

Not only are these tips useful to Human Resources professionals, but they can help us all deal to stress in our work lives.

More than 80% of workers in the United States admit to having job-related stress. This continued stress frequently leads to burnout, which can affect an employee’s ability to remain productive in the workplace. Therapeutic behavior management can be beneficial to any employee experiencing job-related stress.

Job Stress vs. Professional Challenges

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the perception of job stress is frequently confused with professional challenges. These two concepts are not one and the same.

Job stress leads to unhealthy physical and emotional reactions, whereas professional challenges can energize an individual both mentally and physically.

Challenges motivate professionals to master new skills that will improve their job performance. Successfully completing a challenge at work frequently leads to the same feeling of satisfaction an individual experienced following accomplishments during their college career.

A survey conducted by Northwestern National Life finds that 40% of the workers surveyed feel their jobs are very stressful. Additionally, one-fourth of employees consider their jobs to be the number one stressor in their lives.

The Effect of Job Stress on an Individual’s Health

When an individual becomes stressed, the brain begins to prepare the body to take defensive action. This defensive action is frequently referred to as the fight or flight response.

During this response:

  • The nervous system arouses and releases hormones to enhance the senses
  • Respiration deepens
  • The pulse quickens
  • Muscles become tense

Although occasional or brief episodes of stress are of little concern, stressful situations that keep the body in a continuous state of activation must be addressed.

A continued state of fight or flight activation increases the amount of wear and tear on the biological systems throughout the body. Eventually, the ability for the body to defend and repair itself becomes compromised. This increases the risk of the individual becoming ill or injured.

Reduce Stress by Changing Your Thoughts About Work

Dr. Frank Ghinassi, who has served on the board of the Academic Behavioral Health Consortium, states that in order to make it through the workday with less stress, we need to alter the way we think about work. Changing our perspective may significantly reduce the apprehension and nervousness we experience in the workplace.

Ghinassi states that it is not necessarily the facts that compel our emotions, but what we think about a particular event. Our cognitive interpretations are responsible for driving how we feel.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Job-Related Stress

The National Institute of Mental Health recognizes CBT as an effective treatment for anxiety disorders and depression.

CBT therapy is unique in that it focuses on the beliefs and thoughts a patient has, rather than a patient’s actions. Because job-related stress is frequently caused by perception, some of the strategies utilized in CBT therapy may help individuals who are dealing with job-related stress.

4 CBT-Inspired Strategies to Reduce Job-Related Stress

1. Prioritize

Stress levels begin to rise as our responsibilities increase throughout the workday. Make a list of the things you need to accomplish. Rate these tasks according to importance. Chances are that several tasks are crucial, while others are not very important. Now you can focus your attention on the crucial tasks; completing the unimportant tasks only after the crucial tasks have been addressed.

By taking the time to prioritize, you can clearly see the tasks that require immediate attention and which tasks can be addressed at your leisure; thus reducing your stress levels.

2. Create an Oasis

Whenever your attention wanders and you begin thinking stressful thoughts, Ghinassi recommends taking a break. Find a quiet place where you can perform calming non-physical exercises. These exercises may include positive imagery, deep breathing, and listening to soothing music.

3. Use Probability to Eliminate Negative Thoughts

Catastrophizing is a type of thought pattern that focuses on every possible mistake or slip up that can lead to a downfall. Besides causing stress, this kind of black-and-white thinking may cause you to have a sense of impending doom. Instead, Ghinassi suggests controlling these thoughts by weighing the likelihood – or probability – of something happening. Once you bring this technique into your regular patterns of thought, it can be a calming influence in eliminating worry about things that aren’t likely to manifest into actual problems.

4. The Cognitive Flip

If you feel as if you have lost control of a situation, you can try to curb stress levels by thinking about the things you can control. That doesn’t mean the things you can’t control won’t happen but by focusing on what you have the power to control, you are reminded that you can shape your own outcomes.

Having these behavior management tools at your disposal and knowing how to use them will help you manage stress, often before it becomes debilitating. If you are a manager, fostering some of these patterns in a general way can help your staff.

By addressing staff mental health issues, performance levels increase and a company or organization becomes a better place to work. A qualified leader in a company’s human resources department will encourage the use of these techniques by everyone in the company, when needed. They can be used to significantly improve the atmosphere and health of the work force.

Knowing methods like this to improve morale and productivity is just one small – but very effective – part of an advanced human resources education, such as a Master of Science in Human Resources Management. If you want to step up and do more for your company, look into the online master’s in human resources management offered by The University of Scranton.

5 Tips To Create A Stellar Resume

Writing a great resume is a balancing act. You need to outline your portfolio with professional keywords in your field, but also stand out from the pack. In addition, you need to strike a balance between presenting brief career highlights for recruiters who view resumes at a high-level while describing a greater depth of your experience for hiring managers who are taking a deeper dive.

1. Select the right format

Choosing the right format for your resume depends on your industry or profession. Careers like banking, finance, and law are considered traditional, while positions in advertising, fashion, art, and innovative technologies are more creative. Many fields are somewhere in between.

As a rule of thumb, standard resume formats are expected in traditional fields. On the other hand, job seekers in creative fields have used innovative new formats including video, websites, social media tools, and even handmade books and artifacts to craft successful resumes.

2. Customize your resume

According to a recent CareerBuilder survey, 61 percent of employers prefer a resume that is customized to an open position.2 CareerBuilder also found that 48 percent of employers spend less than two minutes reading a resume.

That means you should prepare a separate resume for each job that you apply to, preferably using bullet points and highlighting your most relevant skills and experience.

3. Select a suitable length

Most of the time, one page is best because you generally are writing for busy recruiters. But occasionally, two pages may win you the job, especially for hiring managers looking for a range of experience, according to specialists convened by Monster.com.3

Whatever you do, choose your words carefully so that you are not featuring outdated or irrelevant skills.

4. Be selective with word choice

Here’s a warning to resume writers: avoid clichés and outdated expressions. Hiring managers and recruiters in a recent survey by CareerBuilder ranked these as words as the most offensive:4

  • Best of breed
  • Go-getter
  • Think outside the box
  • Synergy
  • Go-to person

The hiring executives also gave examples of words they would like to see on resumes, including:

  • Achieved
  • Improved
  • Trained/ mentored
  • Managed
  • Created

5. Avoid formatting mistakes

These days, resumes are often scanned by machines to determine if you have the relevant requirements. Make your resume “machine-readable” by keeping it to a standard font, without special features such as italics or underlining.5

Many employers also advise having text only and no images or graphics.6

With these tips and a mention of your higher education, you could achieve your goals and land the job you have been waiting for!

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Sources:

1Fortune.com. Congrats, MBA Grads. http://fortune.com/2015/05/19/mba-graduates-starting-salary/

2CareerBuilder.com. Employers Reveal Biggest Resume Blunders in Annual Survey. http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?ed=12%2F31%2F2015&id=pr909&sd=8%2F13%2F2015

3Monster.com. The one-page resume vs. the two-page resume. http://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/one-page-or-two-page-resume

4CareerBuilder.com. Hiring managers rank best and worst words on a resume in a recent CareerBuilder survey. http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?id=pr809&sd=3/13/2014&ed=03/13/2014

5Dummies.com. How to create a scannable resume. http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-create-a-scannable-resume.html

6CBSMoneyWatch: 10 resume errors that will land you in the trash. http://www.cbsnews.com/news/10-resume-errors-that-will-land-you-in-the-trash/

DBA Program Research Award Presented 

At The University of Scranton’s Kania School of Management Annual Accounting Dinner on May 3, 2018, Doctorate of Business Administration (DBA) student Marcus Burke received the first ever Dr. Douglas M. Boyle DBA Outstanding Research Award recognizing his exceptional research efforts with University of Scranton Accounting faculty. Burke, who holds a Bachelor’s degree in Music Composition from Old Dominion University and Master’s degree in Management from Texas A&M University-Commerce (TAMUC), began pursuing his DBA at The University of Scranton in August 2017 as a member of the program’s flagship cohort. Prior to returning for his terminal degree, Burke gained professional experience at CMA CGM (America) LLC as a Database Administrator and Web Application Developer before being promoted to a Business Architect, TAMUC as a Senior Web Developer, and TAMUC and Marist College as an adjunct faculty member teaching in the areas of Accounting Information Systems, Systems Analysis and Design, Data Information and Management, and Enterprise Resource Planning.

During his first year in the DBA program, Burke completed and submitted a research article with Drs. Douglas M. Boyle and Daniel P. Mahoney to Management Accounting Quarterly entitled “Goodwill Accounting: The Matter of Serial Non-Impairment.” This research uses thirteen years of archival data covering 1,646 firms from Compustat and Thompson ONE to examine the number of firm acquisitions and their respective goodwill impairment rates to determine the existence of notable trends related to the non-impairment of goodwill among firms with high business combination rates. 

Burke has also co-authored a case with Drs. Megan Burke and Sandra Gates entitled “To Amend or Not to Amend: A Tax Consulting Case” which appears in the Journal of Accounting Education (2017). Currently, he is working with Dr. Megan Burke on research related to managerial ability and its relation to a firm’s tax posture, and with Drs. Sandra Gates and Megan Burke on an article for the Accounting History Review on Benjamin Montgomery and the role of slavery on the development of American accounting. 

When asked about his experience with being part of The University of Scranton’s DBA Program, Burke stated, “During my time in the DBA program, I have interacted with the professors in a variety of settings, both inside and outside the classroom. Within that time, and during those interactions, I have been consistently and thoroughly impressed with their enthusiasm, dedication, and commitment to academic excellence. The life-lessons and knowledge conveyed within the classroom are uniquely targeted to help guide and propel students toward future success. As program director, Dr. Douglas M. Boyle makes a noticeable and concerted effort to bring in individuals from both the academy and the professional world to establish a high level of knowledge transference and create relationship building between his students and the global community.” 

Burke, originally from Virginia Beach, Virginia, currently lives in Poughkeepsie, New York, with his wife, Megan, an accounting professor a Marist College, and his two children, Justin and Evelyn. He continues to enjoy playing music and playing taxi driver for his children’s extracurricular activities. 

“As program director, Dr. Douglas M. Boyle makes a noticeable and concerted effort to bring in individuals from both the academy and the professional world to establish a high level of knowledge transference and create relationship building between his students and the global community.”

To learn more about the DBA program at The University of Scranton, click here.

Dream Big, then Dream Even Bigger

Are you ready for an international career?

In a world where international business continues to grow at a rapid pace, working abroad is becoming a more common opportunity. For both professionals whose careers are still in the early stages and those who are at midpoint or beyond, working internationally can be beneficial. Studies show professionals who work overseas tend to advance more quickly than those who remain in the U.S.Of course, preparing yourself to work outside the U.S. requires more than a current passport and updated vaccinations. Different cultures and regions may have different expectations. So, it’s important to thoroughly research such things as work hours and work weeks to make sure a move would be a good fit for you.

You should also consider what kind of customs and business culture is prevalent in other countries. Some countries, such as Germany, expect and encourage assertiveness from their leaders; in others, like Mexico, it is more common to develop a personal relationship before conducting business. Knowing that your work or management style fits the culture is vital to laying the groundwork for a successful overseas career.

Know thyself

While working in another country can sound exciting and exotic, it can also be isolating. That’s why it’s important to understand your own personal needs, such as whether you are able to spend time alone or adapt to a completely new social setting. Experts say someone who is outgoing and extroverted is more likely to thrive in a different culture than someone who is introverted and may have trouble striking up relationships with others.

It’s also important for you to be able to get along well with many different personality types and to “roll with the punches.” Since you will likely encounter many unexpected situations both living and working in a different country, it’s important for you to be able to adapt well to change. Evaluate your strengths, likes and dislikes carefully and honestly, and study the area where you’re interested in working to make certain it is a good fit both personally and professionally.

You will also want to think about how a move would affect the important relationships in your life. Although it’s easier than ever to communicate with loved ones regardless of where they are, living abroad changes the nature of the relationship. How well will you do living far away? If you have a family, how will a move affect them? Regardless of whether they are moving with you or will stay in the U.S., a move would affect everyone and needs to be carefully studied, thought out and discussed.

It’s fairly easy to look at the advantages of working overseas, but make sure you take time to look at the disadvantages, too, to see if they offset your desire to make a move. It’s better to continue working in the U.S. if you don’t feel you’re prepared for a move overseas or if you have concerns about some of the cultural practices.

Preparation is key to succeeding overseas. Without proper planning and a thorough evaluation of the situation, the move could prove disastrous. Improve your odds of success by learning as much as you can about the country, the position, and the expectations that go with it. Then make an educated decision that’s best for you.

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Sources:

http://www.forbes.com/2010/11/04/foreign-overseas-jobs-leadership-careers-human-capital-2-10-employment.html

http://www.careercast.com/career-news/are-you-suited-overseas-assignment

http://www.ytravelblog.com/9-ways-prepare-protect-working-abroad/

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