Graduate Education

Graduate Education

So, You Want to be a Leader?

Whether in their first management position or at the top of an organizational chart, good leaders never stop growing. In addition, when managers get better, the entire organization benefits: Numerous studies confirm that good leaders correlate with high employee satisfaction, engagement, commitment, and even profitability.1

Below are some attributes that can help you become a better leader:

Communication.

Arguably the most important leadership skill, communication is often a top area for improvement. According to one study, managers who improved their overall effectiveness over a 12- to 18-month period were more likely to have improved their communication skills than any other attribute.2

To update your communication skills, find ways to play to your strengths and improve on weaknesses. If you have been told your e-mails are unclear, have a co-worker review them before you hit send. If your team is reluctant to approach you, establish an open-door policy or make a point of walking around and speaking to everyone. Remember that communication includes listening, not just speaking.

Set expectations—and enforce them.

Studies show that at all levels, only half of leaders hold people to task when they don’t deliver.3It’s vital to set expectations for your team and yourself and ensure that everyone contributes.

Give feedback.

Employees—and especially younger generations—want to know how they are doing. More than half (60 percent) of respondents in one survey said they want feedback daily or weekly, and yet fewer than 30 percent receive it on a regular basis, according to another study.4

Feedback works best when it’s about specific situations and given regularly, not saved for a quarterly or annual performance review. Employees crave both recognition for good work and constructive feedback when they are struggling.

Lead by example.

Emphasize behaviors that you want to see in the people you manage. Beyond modeling basic workplace etiquette and a willingness to address challenges, your own supervisors are counting on you to reflect the company’s core mission and values.

Be positive.

No work situation is without challenges and stress. Keeping a positive outlook when problems arise helps your team focus on addressing problems, not poor morale. Projecting confidence in times of crisis isn’t just good sense—it’s a key part of the role of a manager.

Learn to delegate.

Working in teams and bouncing ideas off your peers can create high-quality work while keeping your stress levels down. Train and trust your team to take on appropriate tasks.

Know your team.

The more you know the strengths and weaknesses of the people who report to you, the better you will be able to match them with roles and responsibilities that synchronize with their interests. Knowing your co-workers on a personal level can pay huge dividends in morale—and make your own time as a leader far more enjoyable and rewarding.

Encourage others to grow.

For you to advance as a leader, you must help your team members do the same. Encourage them to take on more challenging tasks, and help them network and develop skills they will need as they grow into leadership roles of their own.5

The University of Scranton Master of Business Administration can help you develop the ability to lead in today’s changing workplace with the values of ethics and social responsibility that are the hallmark of a Jesuit education.

Learn more about The University of Scranton’s MBA program.


 

SOURCES:
1 Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman, “How Damaging Is a Bad Boss, Exactly?,” Harvard Business Review, https://hbr.org/2012/07/how-damaging-is-a-bad-boss-exa
2 Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman, “How Poor Leaders Become Good Leaders,” Harvard Business Review, https://hbr.org/2013/02/how-poor-leaders-become-good-l
3 Darren Overfield and Rob Kaiser, “One Out of Every Two Managers Is Terrible at Accountability,” Harvard Business Review, https://hbr.org/2012/11/one-out-of-every-two-managers-is-terrible-at-accountability
4 Maren Hogan, “5 Employee Feedback Stats That You Need to See,” LinkedIn Talent Blog, https://business.linkedin.com/talent-solutions/blog/trends-and-research/2016/5-Employee-Feedback-Stats-That-You-Need-to-See
5 Avery Augustine, “5 Strategies That Will Turn Your Employees Into Leaders,” The Muse, https://www.themuse.com/advice/5-strategies-that-will-turn-your-employees-into-leaders

We Are SO Proud!

The University of Scranton conferred more than 625 master’s and doctoral degrees at its graduate commencement ceremony on May 25 in the Byron Recreation Complex. Graduates recognized at the ceremony include those who completed their degree requirements in August and December of 2018, as well as January and May of 2019.

The University conferred three doctor of nursing practice degrees, 38 doctor of physical therapy degrees and more than 585 master’s degrees in various disciplines. Graduates represented several foreign countries and 39 states, including Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Washington, among others. The programs with the most graduates at Scranton were the master of business administration, master of accountancy, master of health administration, occupational therapy and educational administration.

University of Scranton President Rev. Scott R. Pilarz, S.J., addressed the graduates and their guests. Degrees were conferred by Father Pilarz upon candidates presented by Debra A. Pellegrino, Ed.D., dean of the Panuska College of Professional Studies; Murli Rajan, Ph.D., interim dean of the Kania School of Management; and Brian P. Conniff, Ph.D., dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Also speaking at the ceremony were Jeff Gingerich, Ph.D., provost and senior vice president for academic affairs; Julie Ann Nastasi, Sc.D., assistant professor of occupational therapy;  Michael K. Short ’99, Alumni Society president; and Rev. John Sivalon, Ph.D., director of international learning programs.

Graduate students were honored for academic achievement in their specific academic area. Outstanding Academic Awards were presented to Lindsey H. Hayde, Center Valley, Doctor of Nursing Practice; and Lauren Elizabeth Bonitz, Endicott, New York, Doctor of Physical Therapy. Outstanding Academic Awards for master’s level programs were presented to the following graduates in the programs as listed: Christine Emily Ahrens, Reading, health informatics; Jacqueline Rose Bailey, Waverly Township, school counseling; Courtney L. Boag, Basking Ridge, New Jersey, special education; Hannah Bobrowski, Drums, general business administration; Amy Lynn Coppola, Lambertville, New Jersey, human resources; Malak Daas, Scranton, marketing; Matthew A. Fava, New Carrollton, Maryland, chemistry; Louis J. Finnerty, Old Forge, health administration; Emily E. Gardner, Huguenot, New York, occupational therapy; Lauren Michelle Jurbala, Avoca, family nurse practitioner; Kari S. Koval, Leola, clinical chemistry; Amanda C. Lara, Hazleton, clinical mental health counseling; Erika V. Maxson, Greentown, secondary education; Ethan Chad Moser, Boyertown, finance; Daniel R. Muthersbaugh, Boyertown, operations management; Kayleen Elizabeth Notchick, Bellefonte, curriculum and instruction; Viren J. Patel, Scranton, biochemistry; Lindsay M. Pine, Vestal, New York, nurse anesthesia; Bobbi Lou Pino-y-Torres, Marquette, Michigan, healthcare management; Kyle James Potter, Mahopac, New York, finance; Sara T. Rizzo, Danbury, Connecticut, accounting; Pierre Richard Seche, Sunrise, Florida, human resources; Stephen Michael Skierski, Scott Township, theology; Jennifer Ann Whigham, Owego, New York, enterprise resource planning; Mara Catherine Wolfe, Ringtown, rehabilitation counseling; Donna Ann Yoder, Eagle, Colorado, accountancy; and Kurt Eric Zimmermann, Rockaway, New Jersey, educational administration.

An archived recording of the ceremony can be seen at www.scranton.edu/eventslive.

We Are Redefining Business Education

The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) recognized The University of Scranton’s Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) program for “Innovations and Best Practices in Canada, Latin America and the United States.” Just 43 colleges from the two continents were included in the just-released publication that recognizes the “impactful ways” AACSB member schools are redefining business education.

AACSB recognized Scranton for providing a non-traditional research DBA in accounting that “promotes diversity and practice relevance by providing a flexible path for experienced practitioners to gain the knowledge and credentials required to succeed in tenure-track positions at AACSB-accredited institutions.”

The University developed its DBA program in accounting in response to the pending shortage of accounting faculty and The Pathways Commission on Accounting Higher Education of the American Accounting Association (AAA) and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) call to develop more flexible, non-traditional tracks to an accounting doctorate for experienced practitioners. AACSB also has recognized this need.

Several Scranton accounting faculty members researched and published several manuscripts in top-tier journals examining the national challenge as part of their research to develop the DBA program at the University.

The University’s DBA program in accounting, launched in the fall of 2017, was developed specifically to provide experienced practitioners with a practical, flexible pathway to an academic career, while still providing for the development of the knowledge and skill set necessary to become a “scholarly academic,” that is one who is most qualified to serve in a tenure-track position at a school of business that possesses or is seeking formal accreditation by AACSB International.

Douglas M. Boyle, DBA, associate professor, accounting department chair, and DBA program director at Scranton said the innovative doctorate program provides a flexible structure and practice relevance, in addition to training for teaching excellence.

“First, the program has a single concentration in accounting. This innovation enables the program participants to engage earlier and more deeply in research in the accounting discipline, thus better preparing them to publish in quality journals,” said Dr. Boyle. “Second, the program follows a cohort model and is delivered in a flexible manner through monthly on campus residencies, allowing participants to retain their professional positions and practice relevance. Third, the program includes faculty from Scranton and nationally recognized scholars from other AACSB institutions, serving as program advisors in the dissertation process. In addition to extensive coursework in business literature, theory and methods, the program also includes courses in the academic governance, teaching excellence, Jesuit pedagogy and applied research to address practice relevance.”

According to Dr. Boyle the DBA’s first three cohorts of 35 doctoral candidates represent a very diverse group of professionals with extensive practice experience. The majority of the candidates are female and over 20 percent represent individuals of color.

“This diversity far exceeds that of population of tenured faculty and senior accounting leaders in practice,” said Dr. Boyle. He also said the initial scholarly outcomes for the DBA students have included numerous conference presentations, proceeding and peer-reviewed publications, with several candidates already having published manuscripts in the top five practice journals.


Learn more about the DBA program at The University of Scranton.

What Can You Expect From a Scranton MAcc Education?

The Kania School of Management has established the following Learning Goals for the Accountancy Program:

Students will gain extensive knowledge in the field of accounting and understand the manner in which accounting information is generated and disseminated.

  • Students will research advanced current topics in accounting and demonstrate an understanding of both theoretical and practical applications of their findings.
  • Students will understand the processes of the governing bodies charged with the creation and oversight of the various accounting and auditing standards/practices.
  • Students will understand how accounting information is generated and how it is used by key stakeholders.

Students will be capable of applying an advanced level of accounting knowledge as a means of solving business problems.

  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of advanced accounting concepts and the ways in which such concepts can be applied to current reporting requirements.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to use accounting information in solving current real world problems commonly faced by key stakeholders like managers and current and prospective investors/creditors.

Students will be capable of critically analyzing accounting information and utilizing their knowledge of the field to disseminate value-added insights throughout the firm.

  • Students will analyze business situations and provide value-added insights and recommendations to contribute to the decision making process.
  • Using appropriate accounting methods, students will critique the firm’s performance and provide a foundation for performance improvement.

Students will be able to effectively identify and evaluate the kinds of ethical challenges often faced by accounting professionals and express their ability to appropriately respond in a manner that is consistent with the profession’s high ethical expectations.

  • Students will demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of ethical theory, principles, and rules via direct application to practical ethical dilemmas.
  • Students gain an understanding of the high ethical expectations of the profession and how to become more aware of their own behaviors and life choices as a means of fulfilling such expectations.

Students will understand the global environment of the accounting profession and the critical leadership role they must be able to fill within the broader business environment.

  • Through analyses of specific management scenarios, students will analyze the critical role accounting professionals play in the global business environment.
  • Students will apply accounting techniques to add value and insights and thus enable the firm to capitalize on emerging business opportunities.

Students will demonstrate the kinds of advanced communication skills that are consistent with the profession’s high demands and expectations.

  • Students will understand the importance of providing effective communication to key stakeholders within and outside of the firm.
  • By way of a series of writing assignments targeted toward satisfying the expectations of key stakeholders, students will demonstrate a mastery of writing skills.

Learn more about the MAcc program here.
Watch our MBA/MAcc program video here.

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