Award Winning DBA Faculty!

University of Scranton accounting professor Douglas M. Boyle, D.B.A., was profiled as one of just six “Professors to Know in Business Programs Based in the Northeast” selected by Bschools.org, an online resource for entrepreneurs. The professors, who teach at business schools in the Northeast with online MBA programs, were selected based on their professional experience and knowledge.

An award-winning researcher and teacher, Dr. Boyle is chair of the University’s Accounting Department, director of the University’s DBA program and the founder and director of the University’s Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program.

A Certified Public Accountant as well as a Certified Management Accountant, Dr. Boyle has more than 25 years of industry executive experience. He has served in executive roles in startup, middle market and Fortune 500 companies where he has held the positions of chief executive officer, president, chief operations officer and chief financial officer. He currently serves as chair of Allied Services Foundation’s Board of Directors.

At Scranton, Dr. Boyle was named the Kania School of Management’s (KSOM) Alperin Teaching Fellow for 2015 to 2018 and received the KSOM Advisory Board’s Award for Curriculum Innovation for 2017-2018. He has twice earned the KSOM Teacher of the Year award and earned the Provost Excellence Awards for the Scholarship of Teaching in 2014 and for Scholarly Publication in 2012. He was awarded the Outstanding Accounting Educator of the Year Award from the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants in 2015. In addition, three research papers he has authored with fellow KSOM faculty members have received the Institute of Management Accountants’ Lybrand Medals for “outstanding papers.”

Dr. Boyle earned his bachelor’s degree from The University of Scranton, a MBA from Columbia University and a doctorate from Kennesaw State University.

To learn more about the DBA program at The University of Scranton, click here!

DBA Program Research Award Presented 

At The University of Scranton’s Kania School of Management Annual Accounting Dinner on May 3, 2018, Doctorate of Business Administration (DBA) student Marcus Burke received the first ever Dr. Douglas M. Boyle DBA Outstanding Research Award recognizing his exceptional research efforts with University of Scranton Accounting faculty. Burke, who holds a Bachelor’s degree in Music Composition from Old Dominion University and Master’s degree in Management from Texas A&M University-Commerce (TAMUC), began pursuing his DBA at The University of Scranton in August 2017 as a member of the program’s flagship cohort. Prior to returning for his terminal degree, Burke gained professional experience at CMA CGM (America) LLC as a Database Administrator and Web Application Developer before being promoted to a Business Architect, TAMUC as a Senior Web Developer, and TAMUC and Marist College as an adjunct faculty member teaching in the areas of Accounting Information Systems, Systems Analysis and Design, Data Information and Management, and Enterprise Resource Planning.

During his first year in the DBA program, Burke completed and submitted a research article with Drs. Douglas M. Boyle and Daniel P. Mahoney to Management Accounting Quarterly entitled “Goodwill Accounting: The Matter of Serial Non-Impairment.” This research uses thirteen years of archival data covering 1,646 firms from Compustat and Thompson ONE to examine the number of firm acquisitions and their respective goodwill impairment rates to determine the existence of notable trends related to the non-impairment of goodwill among firms with high business combination rates. 

Burke has also co-authored a case with Drs. Megan Burke and Sandra Gates entitled “To Amend or Not to Amend: A Tax Consulting Case” which appears in the Journal of Accounting Education (2017). Currently, he is working with Dr. Megan Burke on research related to managerial ability and its relation to a firm’s tax posture, and with Drs. Sandra Gates and Megan Burke on an article for the Accounting History Review on Benjamin Montgomery and the role of slavery on the development of American accounting. 

When asked about his experience with being part of The University of Scranton’s DBA Program, Burke stated, “During my time in the DBA program, I have interacted with the professors in a variety of settings, both inside and outside the classroom. Within that time, and during those interactions, I have been consistently and thoroughly impressed with their enthusiasm, dedication, and commitment to academic excellence. The life-lessons and knowledge conveyed within the classroom are uniquely targeted to help guide and propel students toward future success. As program director, Dr. Douglas M. Boyle makes a noticeable and concerted effort to bring in individuals from both the academy and the professional world to establish a high level of knowledge transference and create relationship building between his students and the global community.” 

Burke, originally from Virginia Beach, Virginia, currently lives in Poughkeepsie, New York, with his wife, Megan, an accounting professor a Marist College, and his two children, Justin and Evelyn. He continues to enjoy playing music and playing taxi driver for his children’s extracurricular activities. 

“As program director, Dr. Douglas M. Boyle makes a noticeable and concerted effort to bring in individuals from both the academy and the professional world to establish a high level of knowledge transference and create relationship building between his students and the global community.”

To learn more about the DBA program at The University of Scranton, click here.

An MBA Is the New Bachelor’s Degree

Earning a bachelor’s degree is commendable, and increasingly important in the workplace. But those trying to stand out as an employee or job applicant should consider attaining an even higher level of education. Many employers want to see a master’s degree, and it may be in your financial interest to get one.

According to a Washington Post report, those with a master’s degree can expect to earn $457,000 more over the course of their career than those with just a bachelor’s degree. Also the number of jobs that require a master’s degree are projected to increase at a much higher rate than other jobs, through 2020.1

A master’s degree today is as prevalent as a bachelor’s degree was in the 1960s, according to Vox, which also said that a master’s degree in business administration is growing faster than other master level degrees.2 In 1971, 11.2% of all master’s degrees were in business. By 2012, that percentage more than doubled to 25.4%.

A Practical Degree

An MBA is useful in fields as diverse as accounting, healthcare, manufacturing, information systems, logistics, telecommunications, retail, finance and banking, law, consulting, pharmaceuticals, hospitality, insurance, and engineering. The degree is increasingly important in business today.

Today, with modern technology, it’s easier  than ever for aspiring students to get a quality MBA degree!

The MBA  is used as a screening tool by employers to find the most qualified candidates with the advanced education necessary for the job. Showing a willingness to invest time and money to get additional education signals to the hiring manager that the candidate is serious about their career.

The University of Scranton’s MBA program offers both  broad-based study in all aspects of business, or a focus in a specialized area such as accounting, operations management, healthcare management, human resources, international business or enterprise resource planning.

The Payoff

According to data from head hunter Career Bliss,3 those with master’s degrees usually earn more than those with bachelor’s degrees. For instance, a business manager earns on average 22% more with the advanced degree than with a bachelor’s degree.

For more information on how an MBA can help you, check out The University of Scranton’s MBA Program.

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Sources:

1http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/brand-connect/wp/2014/03/14/overall-trends/
2http://www.vox.com/2014/5/20/5734816/masters-degrees-are-as-common-now-as-bachelors-degrees-were-in-the-60s
3http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20110817006495/en/CareerBliss-Data-Reveals-Top-10-Jobs-Master%E2%80%99s

 

13 New Students will Benefit from a Scranton DBA Education

The University of Scranton welcomed the second cohort of students into its doctor of business administration (DBA) program.

Douglas M. Boyle, DBA, associate professor, Accounting Department chair and DBA program director, faculty from the DBA program, University Trustees and DBA students who entered the program in the fall of last year, joined together to help orient the new students into the program at a welcome session on campus.

Housed in the University’s Kania School of Management, the DBA program began in the fall semester of 2017.

The University’s DBA program, with a concentration in accounting, was developed to provide experienced practitioners with a practical pathway to an academic career. The program offers participants flexibility, while still providing for the development of the knowledge and skill set necessary to become a “scholarly academic” – one who is qualified to teach at a school of business that possesses or is seeking formal accreditation by Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International).

The incoming DBA students are:

Shea N. Burden of Athens, Ohio;

Felisha N. Fret of Great Neck, New York;

Anuradha (Anu) C. Ghai of Allentown;

Jessica L. Hildebrand of Mountain Top;

Hugh Lambert of Rochester, New York;

Ran Li of Potsdam, New York;

Alexis C. Montelone of Bensalem;

Afia A. Oppong of New City, New York;

Linette Rayeski of West New York, New Jersey;

Savas Saymaz of Whitehall;

Charles Speicher of North Attleboro, Massachusetts;

Ashley L. Stampone of Old Forge;

James W. Sunday of Scranton.

Click here to learn more about the DBA program at The University of Scranton!

What’s the difference between an MBA and a Master of Accountancy?

Students contemplating a career in accounting may be wondering which career path is right for them. Students often take one of two careers paths: a Master of Business Administration with a focus in Accounting, or a Master of Accountancy.

To help students understand the differences between the two programs, both of which are offered by The University of Scranton, here’s what they should know:

Graduates with an MBA focusing on Accounting:

  • Hold a generalized degree

An MBA in accounting is a path for students completing a bachelor’s degree in accounting. This degree program offers the technical core of an MBA with a broad overview of accounting and the skills needed to obtain a job in today’s technology-based business environment

  • Flexible career choices

An MBA with a focus on accounting provides graduates with a variety of job opportunities upon course completion. For those who aren’t sure which field they want to pursue, or who may want to change roles later on, this degree provides that flexibility.

  • Fill many roles

Considering the vast array of knowledge gleaned from an MBA, a graduate can fill many roles within a company. A growing number of businesses require their employees to “wear many hats,” to which this degree lends itself.

By completing the Master of Accountancy program, graduates:

  • Have a deeper understanding of accounting

The online Master of Accountancy program at Scranton offers a challenging curriculum that provides students with a deeper understanding of accounting skills, practices, and theories. Coursework isn’t a broad patchwork of accounting techniques, but a series of in-depth courses that build a foundation for comprehensive and insightful learning.

  • Can specialize in a specific area

Students have the ability to customize their programs and take courses that focus on a specific area of accounting such as taxation or fraud. An increasing number of companies are looking for job applicants with tailored accounting skills, meaning graduates with deeper knowledge of special topics don’t just stand out in a pool of candidates – they’re sought after.

  • Are better prepared to sit for exams

To obtain a career in accounting, many graduates decide to take licensing exams in a specialized field. The coursework involved in the Master of Accountancy program better prepares graduates to take exams such as Certified Public Accountant, Certified Fraud Examiner, or Certified Management Accountant.

  • Can work for the Big 4

If the goal is to work at one of the four biggest accounting firms – KPMG, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Ernst & Young, or Deloitte, completing the Master of Accountancy is the right career choice. The Big 4 look for candidates with high-level skills, advanced degrees and licenses.

The MBA and the Master of Accountancy lead to high-paid employment in the accounting field, with the skills necessary to negotiate a higher salary and better benefits. Both paths offer qualifications that are valuable to an employer and show a level of commitment and skill that’s in demand in today’s workforce.

 

To learn more about the Master of Accountancy program at The University of Scranton, click here.

To learn more about an MBA in Accounting at The University of Scranton, click here.