Distinguished Faculty Members Recognized

Eleven University of Scranton faculty members were honored recently with Provost Faculty Enhancement awards for excellence in teaching, scholarship or service. The Office of the Provost and the Provost Advisory Group selected the recipients from a pool of candidates nominated by academic deans and department chairs.

The following award recipients teach graduate courses:

Douglas Boyle, D.B.A., received the Faculty Senate Excellence in Graduate Teaching Award, which recognizes a faculty member who demonstrates dedication to teaching graduate students in a manner that creates an encouraging and intellectually stimulating environment that promotes critical thinking and learning. Dr. Boyle, associate professor and chair of the Accounting Department, joined the faculty at the University in 2009. He earned his bachelor’s degree from The University of Scranton, his master’s degree from Columbia University and his D.B.A. from Kennesaw State University.


Marian Farrell, Ph.D., received the Excellence for University Service and Leadership Award, which recognizes faculty members who have contributed service to the University community, particularly those who demonstrate academic leadership by effectively mentoring their junior colleagues. Dr. Farrell, professor of nursing, joined the faculty at Scranton in 1990. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from College Misericordia, a second master’s degree from Syracuse University and her Ph.D. from Adelphia University.

 

 


Oliver Morgan, Ph.D., received the Excellence in Adapting Classic Principles of Jesuit Pedagogy into the Curriculum: Magis Award. Dr. Morgan, professor of counseling and human services, joined the faculty at Scranton in 1990. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Fordham University, his master’s degree from Hahnemann Medical University and his Master of Divinity degree from Weston School of Theology, and his Ph.D. from Boston University.

 


Learn more about our graduate programs!

Award Winning DBA Faculty!

University of Scranton accounting professor Douglas M. Boyle, D.B.A., was profiled as one of just six “Professors to Know in Business Programs Based in the Northeast” selected by Bschools.org, an online resource for entrepreneurs. The professors, who teach at business schools in the Northeast with online MBA programs, were selected based on their professional experience and knowledge.

An award-winning researcher and teacher, Dr. Boyle is chair of the University’s Accounting Department, director of the University’s DBA program and the founder and director of the University’s Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program.

A Certified Public Accountant as well as a Certified Management Accountant, Dr. Boyle has more than 25 years of industry executive experience. He has served in executive roles in startup, middle market and Fortune 500 companies where he has held the positions of chief executive officer, president, chief operations officer and chief financial officer. He currently serves as chair of Allied Services Foundation’s Board of Directors.

At Scranton, Dr. Boyle was named the Kania School of Management’s (KSOM) Alperin Teaching Fellow for 2015 to 2018 and received the KSOM Advisory Board’s Award for Curriculum Innovation for 2017-2018. He has twice earned the KSOM Teacher of the Year award and earned the Provost Excellence Awards for the Scholarship of Teaching in 2014 and for Scholarly Publication in 2012. He was awarded the Outstanding Accounting Educator of the Year Award from the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants in 2015. In addition, three research papers he has authored with fellow KSOM faculty members have received the Institute of Management Accountants’ Lybrand Medals for “outstanding papers.”

Dr. Boyle earned his bachelor’s degree from The University of Scranton, a MBA from Columbia University and a doctorate from Kennesaw State University.

To learn more about the DBA program at The University of Scranton, click here!

How to Improve Your Organization

If there is one thing that has characterized the business landscape in the new millennium, it’s change. Disruptive new technologies such as 3-D printing, big data analytics and production line robotics are creating successful new businesses almost overnight, while some traditional business models have become obsolete. Many American companies are struggling to adapt.1

“Organizational change” is the new boardroom buzzword. Retailers are using online sales platforms. Factory owners are bringing in robotics. Suppliers are employing new software-driven inventory techniques. Companies must either adopt the new technologies or succumb to the competition.

Business executives are asking themselves how to make changes in the back office or production floor without alienating their staff.

Change by decree?

Many businesses seeking to adapt get off to an unsteady start because they initiate a change-by-decree strategy. There is a right and wrong way to reset a company’s culture, and authoritarian decrees such as, “Do it because I said so,” are rarely effective.

When leaders announce plans for new initiatives with little or no prior groundwork the effort fail before it begins.

“Forgetting that others in the organization haven’t been a part of the discussions and are not as familiar with all of the reasons for the change, leaders are surprised by the amount of resistance the new change generates,” say management consultants Ken and Scott Blanchard.2

The best way to proceed is from the top down, with company leaders showing themselves as prime exemplars of a new approach. From the start, senior leaders should embody the organization’s new approach, showing employees that real change is underway because it’s already happening at the top.

An appropriate way to motivate change in employees is to provide them with authentic communication about how the organization is proceeding and how it will benefit them. “In the absence of clear, factual communication, people tend to create their own information about the change, and rumors become facts,” the Blanchards say. Decision makers who simultaneously embody and demonstrate the benefits of change within the organization are less likely to face opposition and create a readiness for change before it is implemented.

The Importance of Involving Employees

Executives should plan their change initiatives like generals who prepare for a battle. Anticipate the obvious contingencies ─ the many questions about operations that staff members will have, for example ─ and be prepared to coach people through the process.

But don’t confuse endless PowerPoint presentations with actual communication, as one expert puts it. While meetings and processes can be helpful, they can’t replace meaningful face-to-face communication.

And don’t expect it to be easy. “Change is uncomfortable, and adapting to change is messy,” Fenson notes.

 

Click here for more information on Human Resources programs offered at The University of Scranton.

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Sources:

1 http://www.mckinsey.com/industries/high-tech/our-insights/digital-america-a-tale-of-the-haves-and-have-mores
2 http://www.fastcompany.com/3015083/leadership-now/6-steps-for-successfully-bringing-change-to-your-company
3 http://www.strategy-business.com/article/00255?gko=9d35b
4 http://www.inc.com/articles/2000/06/19312.html
5 https://www.boundless.com/management/textbooks/boundless-management-textbook/organizational-culture-and-innovation-4/managing-change-for-employees-40/strategies-for-successful-organizational-change-215-7289/

 

Looking for a Change: Transitioning from Nursing into Health Informatics

If you currently work in nursing and are thinking about transitioning into a career in health informatics, you’re not alone. Nurses are increasingly interested in health informatics as technology plays a bigger role in the work they do in hospitals and other healthcare settings.  Most people who enroll in a master’s in health informatics program come from either a healthcare or business background.1

Health informatics is a growing field with ample opportunity for employment. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the job market for medical and health services managers (under which health informatics falls) is expected to grow by 17 percent between 2014–2024.2 In addition, the average health informatics salary is almost six figures; as of May 2016, the median annual wage for medical and health services managers was $96,540.2

If you’re considering transitioning from a career in nursing to health informatics, here’s what you need to know.

Health informatics is an interdisciplinary field of work that combines research, data, and medical practice; it’s a career at the intersection of healthcare and technology.3 Some examples of the type of work you might do in health informatics include:

  • Training healthcare staff on recordkeeping processes, increasing patient record accuracy, and addressing technology-related issues in patient care
  • Securing and managing data to help clinicians practice evidence-based medicine and improve quality of care
  • Solving complex administrative problems through data analysis

The Challenges of Becoming a Health Informatics Innovator

Nurses make great candidates for transitioning into a career in health informatics. Why? They are already familiar with the delivery of the care side of the field and have experience with both the clinical process and patient management process.

However, it can be a challenge to get up-to-speed on the technological aspects of the industry, which is why it’s so important to get the proper training. Health informatics requires more technical expertise than you might expect, far beyond what you may be used to for the practice of nursing in a hospital setting.

Look for a master’s in health informatics program that provides more support for learning the technical aspect of the field. Experience with healthcare business and operations, the ability to bring people and processes together, and an understanding of how the end user will use the information you provide may also contribute to your success as a health informatics innovator.

Positioning Yourself for Success

The University of Scranton’s online Master of Science in Health Informatics (MSHI) curriculum is designed to prepare you for a successful career. In addition to providing an integrative approach to patient care, the program provides you with a comprehensive understanding in health care systems, business intelligence, database applications, and information technology so you may excel in the health informatics field.

To learn more about Health Informatics education at The University of Scranton, click here.
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Resources:
  1. “Health information 101.” AHIMA.org. http://www.ahima.org/careers/healthinfo?tabid=what(accessed February 4, 2017).
  2. “Occupational outlook handbook: Medical and health services managers.” BLS.gov. https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/medical-and-health-services-managers.htm(accessed February 4, 2017).
  3. Rouse, M. ”Definition: Health informatics.” SearchHealthIT.TechTarget.com. http://searchhealthit.techtarget.com/definition/health-informatics(accessed April 5, 2017).