The Graduate Student Experience


Our Campus

Our 58-acre campus is located in the heart of Scranton, a community of 75,000 within a greater metropolitan area of 750,000 people.

The Electric City – a nickname the city of Scranton earned as the first city in the United States to have electric street cars – is as much a part of the University as any of our student residences, dining halls or athletic venues.

Graduate Housing

Graduate Housing is currently offered in the Quincy Avenue Apartments, which opened in August of 2015. Graduate housing is based on full-time graduate student status and position on our wait list.

The former junior high school at 528 Quincy Avenue in Scranton’s Historic Hill Section, only a block and a half from The DeNaples Center, has gotten new life through a unique, collaborative project that has revitalized the long-vacant, newly-renovated structure into an early childhood learning center and graduate student housing facility.

The 2nd and 3rd floors of the building have been converted into 24 University-operated graduate apartments that are comparable in design to those in Montrone & Pilarz Halls. Each apartment has a shared kitchen, bathroom, and living room.

Most apartments have double occupancy with a limited number of singles and triples, all with private bedrooms.

Learn more about graduate housing.

Dining on Campus

When you’re looking for a bite to eat on campus, we know you want options, which is why we offer nearly a half-dozen dining locations from which to choose. From signature sandwiches and paninis to stone-baked pizzas and grilled Montreal salmon, if you crave it, it’s likely available. That goes for our vegan/vegetarian and gluten-free students as well.

Don’t confuse our multiple dining and meal options for quantity over quality. Students praise our options because we offer “good healthy food” as inexpensively as “fast food, which encourages healthy eating.” These same students rank our quality of food as “very high.”

Learn more about dining options on campus.

Advising

Upon enrolling at the University, you will be assigned a faculty mentor that will work with you throughout your program. The mentor will assist you with course planning and we encourage you to work closely with your mentor and utilize them as a resource!

The Panuska College of Professional Studies and the Kania School of Management also have Advising Centers to assist with academic advising, course registration, and to develop an overall understanding of your educational needs. For additional information on the PCPSor KSOM Advising Centers, visit their websites.

 

 

 


What can you expect as a graduate student at The University of Scranton?

American Chemical Society Advancing Toward Sustainable Future

WASHINGTON, April 3, 2019 — The American Chemical Society (ACS) today endorsed the Sustainable Chemistry Research and Development Act introduced by Sens. Chris Coons (D-DE) and Susan Collins (R-ME). This legislation, which coordinates U.S. research and development efforts, is considered critical to the future of the chemical sciences.

The act was reintroduced today to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, and would create a multiagency taskforce to guide investment in sustainable chemistry research, as well as a new public-private partnership program. It would also authorize a broad review of existing chemistry programs to give Congress a better understanding of the government’s role in sustainable chemistry.

“Boosting our economy with transformative, sustainable technology is central to the ACS mission,” notes Glenn S. Ruskin, vice president, ACS External Affairs and Communications. “Supporting sustainable chemistry at the federal level will empower the pursuit of cutting-edge science, ensuring a generation of sustainable products, new jobs and a greener world.”

The importance of this issue is outlined in the ACS public policy statement on sustainability and the chemistry enterprise. According to that statement, ACS “recognizes the importance of environmental sustainability and that modern civilization depends on it. Environmental considerations and economic growth are not mutually exclusive. We believe the chemistry enterprise must continue to provide leadership in forging the science and technology that will provide humanity with a sustainable path into the future.”

The American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society, is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To read the original press release from the American Chemical Society, click here!

To learn more about the Chemistry program at The University of Scranton, click here!

DPT Students Share Exciting Research Nationally

Thirty-Four University of Scranton Doctor of Physical Therapy (D.P.T.) students presented research at the American Physical Therapy Association’s Combined Sectors Meeting in Washington, D.C., in January and four D.P.T. students will present their research at the Novel Physiotherapies and Physical Rehabilitation Conference in London in August. The students conducted the research and made the poster presentations with seven physical therapy faculty members, who served as their advisors.

 

At the January conference, D.P.T. students Omar Amer, Scotch Plains, New Jersey; Berta Carmo, Parsippany, New Jersey; Dannylyn Manabat, Long Beach, California; and Jonathan Mayes, Dublin (PA) presented “The Effects of Blood Flow Restriction Therapy on Physical Performance in Adults as Compared to Standard Physical Exercise and Control Groups: A Systematic Review.” Their research was conducted with faculty advisor Peter Leininger, Ph.D.

D.P.T. students Megan J. Manzo ’16, Shelton, Connecticut; Colleen E. Smith ’16, Moscow; Emily M. Suchocki ’16, West Wyoming; and Gianna M. Vitolo ’16, Denville, New Jersey; and faculty advisor Dr. Leininger, presented “Effects of Combined Skilled Aquatic and Land Based Therapy Compared to Land Therapy Alone on Balance and Gait in Adults after a Stroke: A Systematic Review.”

D.P.T. students Stephanie Klug ’16, Morresville, North Carolina; Molly Loftus ’16, Mount Carmel; and Stephanie Zaccaria ’16, Oradell, New Jersey; and faculty advisors Dana Maida, D.P.T., and Janette Scardillo, D.P.T., presented their study “The Effects of Early Mobility in Reducing Length of Stay for Adult Patients in the Intensive Care Unit Due to Trauma: A Systematic Review.”

D.P.T. students Kevin Whelan ’16, Bronx, New York; William Wilcox, Exton; and Alissa Zajac ’16, Oxford, New Jersey, presented “How Is Graded Exercise Testing Being Used in the Clinical Management of Individuals Following a Concussion: A Systematic Review.” Their research was conducted with faculty advisor Dr. Scardillo.

D.P.T. students Danielle Frank ’16, Scranton; Sarah Kosik ’16, Pittston; Courtney Jo James Medfield ’16, Massachusetts; and Krista Ziegler ’16, Scranton, presented their study “The Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Balance and Mobility in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review.” Their research was conducted with faculty advisors Nicholas Rodino, D.P.T., and Renee Hakim, Ph.D.

D.P.T. students William Cavanaugh, Plains; John Huller ’16, Hicksville, New York; Nicholas Mullery ’16, Clark, New Jersey; and Joseph Pichiarello ’16, Dumnore, presented “The Impact of Home Health Care on Cost Effectiveness Compared to Other Post-Acute Settings in Individuals Status Post Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review” Their research was conducted with faculty advisor Tracey Collins, Ph.D.

D.P.T. students Lauren Bonitz ’16, Endicott, New York; Megan Fasano ’16, Blue Bell; Meghan Goyden, Endwell, New York; and Caroline Segota ’16, Floral Park, New York, presented their study “Effectiveness of Gait Interventions in Improving Gait in Adults with Ataxia: A Systematic Review.” Their research was conducted with faculty advisor Jennifer Schwartz, D.P.T.

D.P.T. students Maria Gentile ’16, Jefferson Township; Cassandra Lucke ’16, Archbald; Shannon McSherry ’16, Carmel, New York; and Devin Ryan, Blackwood, New Jersey, presented “The Effect of Equine Related Therapy on Physical and Psychological Well-Being of Older Adults: A Systematic Review.” Their research was conducted with faculty advisors Dr. Schwartz and Dr. Maida.

D.P.T. students Levi Haldeman, Lehighton; Lisa Jackowitz ’16, Moosic; Aaron Oquendo ’16, Wanaque, New Jersey; and Matthew Wells ’16, Hillsborough, New Jersey and faculty advisor Dr. Hakim, presented “The Effects of Intramuscular FES on Objective Gait Measures in Adult Patients with Chronic Stroke: A Systematic Review.”

In addition, Dr. Hakim and University graduates Cassandra Fitzgerald ’15, D.P.T.’18, Fairfield, Connecticut; Elizabeth Palladino ’15, D.P.T.’18, Howell, New Jersey; andSean Scully ’15, D.P.T.’18, Sewell, New Jersey, presented their study “Functional Outcomes of Patients with Orthopedic Diagnoses Receiving Pro Bono Physical Therapy Services in a Student-Run Clinic: A Retrospective Study.”

Poster presentations of research studies were also made at the Washington, D.C., conference by faculty members, including Dr. Maida and Barbara Wagner, D.P.T., faculty emerita, and Heidi Bockelkamp, D.P.T., market director of rehabilitation services at Regional Hospital of Scranton, presented their studies “Determining AM-PAC  ‘6-Clicks’ Cutoff Scores based on Type of Joint Replacement to Predict Discharge Destination” and “Determining AM-PAC ‘6-Clicks’ Cutoff Scores based on Patient Age to Predict Discharge Destination Following Elective Joint Replacement.”

The American Physical Therapy Association’s more than 100,000 members include physical therapists, physical therapist assistants and students of physical therapy.

In addition, D.P.T. students Jamie Christensen, Branchville, New Jersey; Maura McGowan ’16, Scranton; Lindsay McGraw ’16, Lakewood; and Cory Piening, Horsham, will present “The Effect of Virtual Reality Training on Balance and Mobility in Adults with Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review” at the Novel Physiotherapies & Physical Rehabilitation Conference in August in London. Their research was conducted with faculty advisor Dr. Hakim.

Story originally shared in Royal News.

Alumna Working on Groundbreaking Technology with Microsoft

Kaitlyn Jones ’18, University of Scranton alumna and occupational therapist, now works for Microsoft on the Xbox accessibility team! In this video, she gives an update on her first couple months working with Microsoft and some of the cool things she’s been doing there.

“Often as students, we have these very strong preconceived notions about what aspect of OT or what specialty you want to go into.  Don’t be afraid to be open to all the different areas, and don’t be afraid to advocate for the value that we can bring as OTs. … There are so many things we have to offer.” -Kaitlyn Jones

To learn more about the OT program at The University of Scranton, click here!