Library Research Prize Winners!

Chrissy and Marjorie3Christina Gavalas and Marjorie Toron, seniors in the Occupational Therapy program, are the winners of the 2016 Library Research Prize for Undergraduate students. They completed a group project for OT 494: Evidence-Based Research.

The Weinberg Memorial Library inaugurated the prize in 2011 to recognize excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge of the methods of research and the information gathering process, and use of library resources, tools, and services.

Honorable Mention awards in the undergraduate category included Alyssa Rodemann, a senior Psychology major; Emily Pocius, a junior English major; and Tim Zinna, a sophomore Finance major.

Allison2

 

The winner of the 2016 Library Research Prize for Graduate students is Allison Ferullo. She is a student in the Nurse Anesthesia Graduate Program and is certified as a Critical Care Registered Nurse (CCRN) as well as in Trauma Nursing Critical Care. Her individual project for NURS 593: Research Methodology was a literature review on distractions in the operating room.

Prize winners were honored at a reception on Thursday, May 12, 2016 in the Heritage Room of the Weinberg Memorial Library.

Information about the Library Research Prize can be found on the website: http://www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Information Literacy

Information_Graphic_RGBIn 1989, the American Library Association defined Information literacy as a set of abilities requiring individuals to “recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.”

This definition has informed library professionals at every level for more than 25 years.  On January 11, 2016, in conjunction with the adoption by the Board of Directors of the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) of the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, an updated definition of information literacy was introduced. “This revised definition of information literacy emphasizes the importance of discourse communities within academic disciplines and the need for placing information literacy in the proper context within those communities.”1

Information literacy is the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning.²

The Framework document identifies a cluster of six  interconnected core concepts or “frames” through which to understand, teach, and develop information literacy. These six frames are presented alphabetically and do not suggest a particular sequence in which they must be learned.

Authority is Constructed and Contextual

Information resources reflect their creators’ expertise and credibility, and are evaluated based on the information need and the context in which the information will be used. Authority is constructed in that various communities may recognize different types of authority. It is contextual in that the information need may help to determine the level of authority required.

Information Creation as a Process

Information in any format is produced to convey a message and is shared via a selected delivery method. The iterative processes of researching, creating, revising, and disseminating information vary, and the resulting product reflects these differences.

Information Has Value

Information possesses several dimensions of value, including as a commodity, as a means of education, as a means to influence, and as a means of negotiating and understanding the world. Legal and socioeconomic interests influence information production and dissemination.

Research as Inquiry

Research is iterative and depends upon asking increasingly complex or new questions whose answers in turn develop additional questions or lines of inquiry in any field.

Scholarship as Conversation

Communities of scholars, researchers, or professionals engage in sustained discourse with new insights and discoveries occurring over time as a result of varied perspectives and interpretations.

Searching as Strategic Exploration

Searching for information is often nonlinear and iterative, requiring the evaluation of a range of information sources and the mental flexibility to pursue alternate avenues as new understanding develops.

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¹Ariew, Susan. 2014. “How We Got Here.” Communications in Information Literacy 8 (2): 208-224.
²
“Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education,” Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), accessed April 15, 2016, www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework

 

 

Basic Literacy

Basic
On its simplest level. . .the ability to read and write. The other four literacies depend on basic literacy.

 

Reading is Fundamental, a non-profit literacy organization that gives books to children, lists the following statisitcs:

    • There are 93 million adults in the U.S. who read at or below the basic level needed to contribute successfully to society.
    • 34 percent of children entering kindergarten lack the basic language skills needed to read.65 percent of fourth graders read at or below the basic level

Additionally, PA Forward, an initiative of Pennsylvania libraries, indicates that 13 percent of Pennsylvanians lack basic literacy skills such as the abilty to read a newspaper or a brochure.

In Lackawanna County, about 20 percent of adults are functionally illiterate. That means that while they are able to read and write, these skills are so basic that they struggle managing the requirements of their jobs or sometimes routine tasks of daily living. This statistic is provided by SCOLA Volunteers for Literacy, a division of the United Neighborhood Centers of Northeastern Pennsylvania. They offer more than 60 programs such as reading, comprehension, life skills, typing, math, vocabulary, spelling, grammar, as well as ESL (English as a Second Language). SCOLA offers tutoring opportunities for volunteers.

Faculty  at The University of Scranton have been collaborating with the Scranton School District to increase literacy in the region. They also want to raise awareness about illiteracy among local doctors and school nurese through the Reach Out and Read program.

 

 

 

 

PA Forward | Pennsylvania Libraries

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PA Forward | Pennsylvania Libraries, an initiative of the Pennsylvania Library Association, has identified five types of literacy that are essential to the greater success of people in all roles of life. The five essential literacies are:

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Libraries have moved far beyond just being book repositories. They’re agile institutions serving real-life needs. Libraries can be key to powering progress and elevating the quality of life in PA by fueling the types of knowledge essential to success: Basic Literacy, Information Literacy, Civic and Social Literacy, Health Literacy, and Financial Literacy. Future posts will address each of the literacies individually.

Library Research Prize Winners!

Christine Panzitta, Stephen Gadomski, Natalie Della Posta, Taryn Anthony, Caroline Swift, and Tricia Gelling
Christine Panzitta, Stephen Gadomski, Natalie Della Posta, Taryn Anthony, Caroline Swift, and Tricia Gelling

Caroline Swift, an MBA student with a concentration in Operations Management, and Christine Panzitta, a junior Secondary Education/History major, were selected as the 2014 Library Research Prize winners.

The Weinberg Memorial Library at The University of Scranton inaugurated the prize in 2011 to recognize excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge of the methods of research and the information gathering process, and use of library resources, tools, and services.

Honorable Mention awards in the Graduate Category included Taryn Anthony, a Chemistry major; Patricia Gelling, an Occupational Therapy major; and a group of Physical Therapy majors consisting of Kyle Corrado, Christine Fischer, Michael McGraw and Kristin Ryffel.

Honorable Mentions were also awarded to two undergraduate students—Natalie Della Posta, a Neuroscience major and Stephen Gadomski, an Exercise Science and Sport major.

Prize winners were honored at a reception on Thursday, May 8, 2014 in the Heritage Room of the Weinberg Memorial Library.

RefWorks Drop in Sessions Available for Help with Citation Management

RefWorks is a citation manager that helps you to keep your research organized, store documents, and create annotated bibliographies. The University of Scranton has a subscription to RefWorks that is available to all students, staff, and faculty.

The library will be hosting drop in instructional sessions for students to take advantage of this powerful tool. All sessions will be in Library room 306. Students can stop in at their convenience to ask questions or to get general instruction on how and why they should be on Ref Works. Available drop-in times are:

Wednesday, February 29 from 12-1pm with Kevin Norris

Monday, March 5 from 3-4pm with Donna Witek

Tuesday, March 6 from 8-9pm with George Aulisio

Wednesday, March 7 from 12-1pm with Kevin Norris

Dr. Zych’s “Kick you out of school program”

Chrysler 300 team

Dr. Zych’s Capstone Marketing class forces students to learn beyond the classroom (hence the clever name for the program). For their final project the “Chrysler 300 team” does work in the library late into the night.

Library Research Prize

The deadline is fast approaching to submit your application for the first annual Library Research Prize which will be awarded by the Weinberg Memorial Library! Completed application packages must be submitted by 4:00 pm on Wednesday, April 27, 2011.

This prize is designed to attract the outstanding research projects from courses taught in departments across The University of Scranton campus. It recognizes excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process, and use of library resources, tools and services.

$500.00 will be awarded to the winning student or group. (If won by a group, then the award will be split equally among the group members.)

Only undergraduate students are eligible. For more information, go to the Library Research Prize web page. If you still have questions, contact Bonnie Oldham, Information Literacy Coordinator, by phone (570-941-4000) or e-mail (bonnie.oldham@scranton.edu)

Library Research Prize

Do you want to win $500? Are you doing a research project for one of your courses here at The University of Scranton? Are you an undergraduate student?

If you answered yes to all three of those questions, then you should submit an application for the Weinberg Memorial Library’s Library Research Prize.  The prize is a new initiative by the library designed to recognize excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process, and use of library resources, tools and services.

Your research project must be one that you completed for a credit bearing course that you took (or will take) at The University of Scranton during the following semesters:
Summer 2010, Fall 2010, Intersession 2011, or Spring 2011

For more information: www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize