Finding New Books Made Easy

WML Research GuidesThanks to the Library’s Cataloging Department, finding new books has never been easier.

Now, if you want to see what new books have come in for a specific subject, then all you have to do is visit the Library’s Research Guides at www.scranton.edu/library/researchguides.

You would then pick a subject, for example “History.” In the History Research Guides page you will see useful links which direct you to helpful Databases, Reference Books, Websites, and contact information for the Librarian Subject Specialist; but now there is also a link to “New Library Books.” Clicking New Library Books will take you to the library’s Catalog and a display of all of the new books that the library has acquired for that specific Academic Department!

Did you hear about Sheli?

Sheli (second from left) represented the U as part of the Northeast Chapter Jeopardy team at the annual PaLA conference

Have you heard about Sheli?  She’s our new Cataloging/Metadata Librarian who also serves as the chair of the Pennsylvania Library Association (PaLA) Technical Services Roundtable.  In this role, she attended the PaLA conference last fall, along with several other University of Scranton librarians, and she has an article in this month’s Pennsylvania Library Association Bulletin called “Technical Services Programs – Big Hit at PaLA.” Congrats, Sheli!

Meet Sheli, Our New Cataloger!

We’d like to introduce the Weinberg’s newest faculty member: Sheli McHugh, our Cataloging/Metadata Librarian!  Sheli joined us in June 2010, having previously served as the Scranton Public Library‘s Head Cataloger.  Sheli has a B.A. from Penn State and earned her M.L.S. at Clarion University in 2005.  She’s a native of Northeastern Pennsylvania and is an active member of the Pennsylvania Library Association.

The next time you visit the Library, stop by the cataloging room on the first floor and say hi!  In the meantime, to help you get to know Sheli, we asked her a few questions:

What made you decide to be a librarian?
After I finished my undergrad degree, I was working full time for my parents.  Lots of people had advice on what I should do for the rest of my life…then my high school principal’s wife suggested I look into library science.  I did a little bit of research (I Googled it!) and the first thing I read was about the librarian at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and how they talk to major film directors and writers every day.  Since my undergrad degree was in film studies, I was sold! 

What do you like most about cataloging?
I like finding a place for things to fit in – like doing a crossword puzzle and figuring out what goes where for each clue.

What’s the strangest item you’ve ever cataloged?
I once cataloged a Gerry McNamara bobble head.

What are you reading now?
I just bought my copy of Mockingjay, the third book in the Hunger Games Trilogy.  I wish I was reading it RIGHT NOW! It’s taunting me from my purse! I’m also reading Wuthering Heights for a book club I belong to at Anthology…but I’m shelving that till I finish Mockingjay.

Where’s the best place to get coffee in NEPA?
My favorite coffee shop is Northern Light Espresso Bar on Spruce St.  But, I also love Zummo’s and Mansour’s.  I definitely go to NLEB the most, so I’ll go with that.

What else should the University community know about you?
I’m the co-chair for the Scranton Reads committee.  We try and get everyone in the community to read the same book and talk about it each October.  This is my second year as co-chair and I’ve been a member of the committee for several years.

PaLA Awards Nomination Deadline Quickly Approaching!!!

Come August 15th it’ll already be too late to nominate your favorite librarian for an award, so it’s best you do it now!

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2010

Categories:

  • Distinguished Service Award: Highest award the associate gives. It may be awarded annually to one person in recognition of exceptional meritorious service to libraries of the Commonwealth.
  • Certificates of Merit: These are awarded to individuals making outstanding contributions during the last five years in Pennsylvania.
  • Elected Official Award: This award may be given annually to an elected official or officials for exemplary support of library service in Pennsylvania.
  • New Librarian Honors Award: Honors a librarian who has been in the profession fewer than six years. It recognizes the originality and inventive ability of a new librarian who devises new and improved methods in library service on a statewide or local level.
  • Trustee of the Year Award: Presented to a public library trustee in recognition of outstanding leadership and service to library development at the local, system, district, and/or state level.
  • Library Support Staff Recognition Award: This award is presented to a library that has consistently encouraged and supported participation in career development activities, particularly those of PaLA for the support staff in Pennsylvania libraries. Nominations should be in the form of a statement of the library’s activities. (A little clarification on this award: It is presented to a library not to a staff member. Does your library provide you with opportunities to develop your library skills through continuing education opportunities? Does your library allow you to attend PaLA conferences and Chapter Meetings as a Support Staff member? Does your library provide you with opportunities to take classes on library related activities or in areas which you can use on the job? Then tell us how that support helps you on your job and give a little recognition to your library.

Nominating is now easier than ever, thanks to the new online form.

2010 Award Nomination Form

Simply fill it out and click submit… It’s that easy!

Pennsylvania academic librarians gather in Scranton

Yesterday, the University of Scranton campus welcomed the Pennsylvania Library Association‘s College & Research Division for its annual conference.  Academic librarians from all over the state (even as far away as Pittsburgh) came to the DeNaples Center to learn from their peers and discuss new ideas.

The theme of this year’s conference was “Information Commons in the Wild: Lessons from the Field.”  Dr. Scott Bennett, Yale Librarian Emeritus and a Library Space Planning consultant, served as the keynote speaker and led conference participants in discussing the philosophy and purpose behind the information commons design model.

In the afternoon, a panel of librarians (Don Smith, Katherine Furlong, Sally Kalin, and Anu Vedantham) shared experiences with creating information commons at their respective institutions (the University of Louisiana at Monroe, Lafayette College, Penn State, and the University of Pennsylvania).  We’ve posted a few photos of Scott and the panel on our Flickr page.

Many thanks to our speakers and all of the librarians who survived I-81 traffic jams to participate! And special thanks to our own Bonnie Oldham, PALA-CRD’s chair elect, for all of her work coordinating the event.

Pennsylvania Library Association Award Nominations


The Pennsylvania Library Association (PaLA) presents six different awards to librarians and library supporters throughout the state at the PaLA Annual Conference. This is your chance to recognize that new librarian on the block, your outstanding public library trustee, an elected official who has advocated for libraries in hard times, or any individual who has made an outstanding contribution to libraries in PA during the last five years. You can even honor a library that has consistently encouraged its support staff to participate in career development by nominating them for the Library Support Staff Recognition Award!

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2010

Download the 2010 Award Nomination Form

Categories:

  • Distinguished Service Award: Highest award the associate gives. It may be awarded annually to one person in recognition of exceptional meritorious service to libraries of the Commonwealth.
  • Certificates of Merit: These are awarded to individuals making outstanding contributions during the last five years in Pennsylvania.
  • Elected Official Award: This award may be given annually to an elected official or officials for exemplary support of library service in Pennsylvania.
  • New Librarian Honors Award: Honors a librarian who has been in the profession fewer than six years. It recognizes the originality and inventive ability of a new librarian who devises new and improved methods in library service on a statewide or local level.
  • Trustee of the Year Award: Presented to a public library trustee in recognition of outstanding leadership and service to library development at the local, system, district, and/or state level.
  • Library Support Staff Recognition Award: This award is presented to a library that has consistently encouraged and supported participation in career development activities, particularly those of PaLA for the support staff in Pennsylvania libraries. Nominations should be in the form of a statement of the library’s activities. (A little clarification on this award: It is presented to a library not to a staff member. Does your library provide you with opportunities to develop your library skills through continuing education opportunities? Does your library allow you to attend PaLA conferences and Chapter Meetings as a Support Staff member? Does your library provide you with opportunities to take classes on library related activities or in areas which you can use on the job? Then tell us how that support helps you on your job and give a little recognition to your library.

Nominating is easy! All you have to do is:
1. Complete the PDF form found at

Download the 2010 Award Nomination Form

(or include the information on the form with your email or mailed submission)

2. Email it to Erin.Dorney@millersville.edu or snail mail it to Erin Dorney, Outreach Librarian, Millersville University Library, P.O. Box 1002, Millersville, PA 17551-0302.

Have questions? Contact 2010 Awards Chair Erin Dorney (erin.dorney@millersville.edu / 717-872-3617) at any time!

We hope you’ll consider submitting a nomination before the deadline of August 15th, 2010.

Welcome (back), Bonnie and George!

It’s been a busy year in the Library, with two important Library staff transitions. You may recall that last year at this time, we bid a fond farewell to Katie Duke, Coordinator of Information Literacy, and welcomed George Aulisio as our new Part-Time Reference Librarian. This year saw us searching for a Librarian to take Katie’s place, and our very own Bonnie Oldham turned out to be the best candidate for the job! This meant Bonnie’s position as Distance Learning Library Services Coordinator became vacant, and after yet another search (this time with one of the largest applicant pools ever seen at the Library), our joy was doubled when George emerged as the top candidate for this position. And so, we welcome (back) Bonnie and George, each in a new job role — Bonnie as Information Literacy Coordinator and George as Distance Learning Library Services Coordinator!

George and Bonnie 008
Bonnie and George in their 2nd floor office in the Weinberg Memorial Library

Bonnie was born in Harrisburg, PA, and raised in the suburbs of Philadelphia. She has lived in Georgia and New Jersey, and twenty years ago she returned to Pennsylvania, where she has remained ever since. She currently resides in Shavertown. She received her undergraduate degree (A.B.) in History from Chestnut Hill College, her Master of Library Science degree from Kutztown University, and her Master of Science in Organizational Management degree from Misericordia University. Bonnie brings 19 total years of experience in academic libraries to her new role as Information Literacy Coordinator.

George grew up in Old Forge, PA, and still calls Old Forge his home. George received his Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy degree from Bloomsburg University, his Master of Library Science degree from Drexel University, and is currently pursuing his Master of Liberal Arts degree at the University of Pennsylvania.

If you are a student or faculty member in the Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Exercise Science and Sport, or Nursing Departments, then Bonnie is the Librarian you will want to get to know. She is the collection development and information literacy liaison to these departments, just as George is the liaison to the Philosophy, Communication, Mathematics and Computer Science Departments. Both are especially looking forward to working more with faculty and students in their collection development areas.

In her free time, Bonnie enjoys cooking and doing crafts – for example, five years ago she made her daughter’s wedding dress. George, who has a deep thirst for knowledge, spends much of his free time pursuing his studies; however, he also enjoys yard work, including cutting the grass and trimming the trees. Both enjoy reading (what librarian doesn’t?), and both can be found sharing the same 2nd floor office in the Weinberg Memorial Library. George can be found in the Library most evenings of the week, Sunday through Thursday, while Bonnie is easiest to find during the day, Monday through Friday. Feel free to stop by and say hello to them – they both welcome visitors!

Spring 2009 Newsletter

Spring2009Newsletter

The Spring 2009 issue of the Weinberg Memorial Library newsletter has arrived!  You can pick up the a paper copy of the Information Update at the Weinberg, or read the online edition.

This semester’s issue, edited by public services librarian Kevin Norris, features an interview with five of the Weinberg’s “NextGen” librarians, in which we discuss our careers, librarian stereotypes (including “guybrarians”),  recent library innovations, and the library of 2050.  Let us know what you think!

New face at WML – Reference Librarian

Greetings to all University students, faculty, staff, and members of the public! I am yet another new staff member at the Weinberg Memorial Library (WML).  My name is Neil Grimes and I was born and grew up in Wilkes-Barre which is a part of the Northeast PA region.  You can find me working at the Reference desk on Sundays from 12pm-5pm and Monday evenings from 6pm-11:30pm.  I began working at the WML back in March of this year.  Everyone has been very welcoming and supportive!  I can’t thank everyone enough for making me feel like the University of Scranton is almost like a second home.  Each day that I spend on campus I find that I learn something different and something new from my co-workers, students, faculty, and members of the public.  

For my undergraduate education, I attended King’s College in Wilkes-Barre where I majored in history and secondary education.  During my undergraduate years, I worked at UPS where I sorted, scanned, and loaded packages and mail that was being sent to places all over the United States.  If you are curious as to how the whole shipping process works, feel free to ask me.  Following my four years at King’s I went on to graduate school at Clarion University of Pennsylvania where I received my Master’s in Library Science.  Following graduation, I began working as a high school librarian in the Wilkes-Barre area. 

Among the skills that I feel one needs to succeed in the 21st century are critical thinking skills, effective writing skills, public speaking skills, and research skills.  These are all skills that I have sharpened over the years and that I use on a daily basis.  Whether we realize it or not, people are constantly using their research skills when they seek to answer questions in their daily lives.  Librarians are very helpful in instructing people as to the best way to research and answer questions, even the most difficult questions.  You would be surprised as to how much you can learn from librarians!  Don’t be afraid to ask for help as librarians are very good to pointing you to the information that you are looking for.

I have been interested in reading and libraries as far back as I can remember.  Among the first books that I ever read were by Dr. Seuss, as I am sure that these are among the first books that most children read.  The most recent book that I finished was I Heard You Paint Houses by Charles Brandt, a true crime story that solves the case of Jimmy Hoffa’s disappearance once and for all.  I won’t reveal any of the details, but I do highly recommend that you read the book.  Recently, I read that Martin Scorsese is going to make this book into a movie starring Robert DeNiro. 

"I Heard You Paint Houses"

Outside of spending time in libraries , I love to travel and have been to Italy, Toronto, New York City, Philadelphia, Washington, DC, Tampa, Florida, and Lawrence, Kansas.  This is not a comprehensive list of the places that I have been to, but it does hit many of the highlights.  Every new place I travel to brings with it new memories as well as the opportunity for some great photographs.  There are some great places to take photographs on campus, don’t be afraid to capture some memories when the chance presents itself.

Need Journal Articles from 1865?

Then JSTOR is a database you want to try.

If you are looking for journal articles from as far back as 1865, this database will provide them for you, and in .PDF full-text format too. Here’s how you would run a search for your topic, in order to find articles about that topic, which were written in bygone days:

  • Select JSTOR on our A-Z List of Databases.
  • The way to narrow your search to find journal articles from a specific time period is to place a check-mark in the box next to “Article” under “Limit To: Type:” and then to put the range of years you are looking for in the “Limit To: Date Range:” fields. So, for example, if I want journal articles on my topic from the years 1865-1940, I will check off “Articles” and then put “From: 1865” and “To: 1940.”
  • Then, type your search topic into the Advanced Search field at the top of the page. Keep in mind that your topic may have been called by a different name back in the 1800s!
  • Then click “Search,” look for article titles that cover what you need, click into them to read the abstracts (summaries) as needed, and select the .PDF option for viewing, printing and saving the articles for your research.

Remember, if you’re working from home or your dorm, make sure you first sign into My.Scranton.edu, and then select “A-Z Database Listing” from inside the Library tab. This way, when you eventually get to JSTOR, the database will recognize you as a student, and it will let you access the full-text .PDF of the articles you need.

Ever wonder what was being written about, say, librarians, in the late 1800s-early 1900s? Go give the search a try to find out!* There is one very interesting article from 1929 about a study of ways that librarians cultivated “wholesome reading interests” back then (“Methods Employed to Stimulate Interests in Reading. I” by William F. Rasche, from The School Review, Vol. 37, No. 1 (Jan., 1929), pp. 29-36) — very interesting indeed.

*So, okay, I know most of you probably don’t care about librarians and our fascinating history as public figures in the community… Ahem. But! Whatever your research interest is (for instance, I know there’s an assignment going around about researching the same social issue in 3 different historical time periods) JSTOR is a great place to start in your search for old journal articles on the topic.