What can KSOM do for you?

The nationally recognized Kania School of Management (KSOM) excels at supplying the tools you need to succeed in the increasingly global and technological world of business.


Earn a business degree at The University of Scranton! Check out our graduate programs here.

Distinguished Faculty Members Recognized

Eleven University of Scranton faculty members were honored recently with Provost Faculty Enhancement awards for excellence in teaching, scholarship or service. The Office of the Provost and the Provost Advisory Group selected the recipients from a pool of candidates nominated by academic deans and department chairs.

The following award recipients teach graduate courses:

Douglas Boyle, D.B.A., received the Faculty Senate Excellence in Graduate Teaching Award, which recognizes a faculty member who demonstrates dedication to teaching graduate students in a manner that creates an encouraging and intellectually stimulating environment that promotes critical thinking and learning. Dr. Boyle, associate professor and chair of the Accounting Department, joined the faculty at the University in 2009. He earned his bachelor’s degree from The University of Scranton, his master’s degree from Columbia University and his D.B.A. from Kennesaw State University.


Marian Farrell, Ph.D., received the Excellence for University Service and Leadership Award, which recognizes faculty members who have contributed service to the University community, particularly those who demonstrate academic leadership by effectively mentoring their junior colleagues. Dr. Farrell, professor of nursing, joined the faculty at Scranton in 1990. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from College Misericordia, a second master’s degree from Syracuse University and her Ph.D. from Adelphia University.

 

 


Oliver Morgan, Ph.D., received the Excellence in Adapting Classic Principles of Jesuit Pedagogy into the Curriculum: Magis Award. Dr. Morgan, professor of counseling and human services, joined the faculty at Scranton in 1990. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Fordham University, his master’s degree from Hahnemann Medical University and his Master of Divinity degree from Weston School of Theology, and his Ph.D. from Boston University.

 


Learn more about our graduate programs!

So, You Want to be a Leader?

Whether in their first management position or at the top of an organizational chart, good leaders never stop growing. In addition, when managers get better, the entire organization benefits: Numerous studies confirm that good leaders correlate with high employee satisfaction, engagement, commitment, and even profitability.1

Below are some attributes that can help you become a better leader:

Communication.

Arguably the most important leadership skill, communication is often a top area for improvement. According to one study, managers who improved their overall effectiveness over a 12- to 18-month period were more likely to have improved their communication skills than any other attribute.2

To update your communication skills, find ways to play to your strengths and improve on weaknesses. If you have been told your e-mails are unclear, have a co-worker review them before you hit send. If your team is reluctant to approach you, establish an open-door policy or make a point of walking around and speaking to everyone. Remember that communication includes listening, not just speaking.

Set expectations—and enforce them.

Studies show that at all levels, only half of leaders hold people to task when they don’t deliver.3It’s vital to set expectations for your team and yourself and ensure that everyone contributes.

Give feedback.

Employees—and especially younger generations—want to know how they are doing. More than half (60 percent) of respondents in one survey said they want feedback daily or weekly, and yet fewer than 30 percent receive it on a regular basis, according to another study.4

Feedback works best when it’s about specific situations and given regularly, not saved for a quarterly or annual performance review. Employees crave both recognition for good work and constructive feedback when they are struggling.

Lead by example.

Emphasize behaviors that you want to see in the people you manage. Beyond modeling basic workplace etiquette and a willingness to address challenges, your own supervisors are counting on you to reflect the company’s core mission and values.

Be positive.

No work situation is without challenges and stress. Keeping a positive outlook when problems arise helps your team focus on addressing problems, not poor morale. Projecting confidence in times of crisis isn’t just good sense—it’s a key part of the role of a manager.

Learn to delegate.

Working in teams and bouncing ideas off your peers can create high-quality work while keeping your stress levels down. Train and trust your team to take on appropriate tasks.

Know your team.

The more you know the strengths and weaknesses of the people who report to you, the better you will be able to match them with roles and responsibilities that synchronize with their interests. Knowing your co-workers on a personal level can pay huge dividends in morale—and make your own time as a leader far more enjoyable and rewarding.

Encourage others to grow.

For you to advance as a leader, you must help your team members do the same. Encourage them to take on more challenging tasks, and help them network and develop skills they will need as they grow into leadership roles of their own.5

The University of Scranton Master of Business Administration can help you develop the ability to lead in today’s changing workplace with the values of ethics and social responsibility that are the hallmark of a Jesuit education.

Learn more about The University of Scranton’s MBA program.


 

SOURCES:
1 Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman, “How Damaging Is a Bad Boss, Exactly?,” Harvard Business Review, https://hbr.org/2012/07/how-damaging-is-a-bad-boss-exa
2 Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman, “How Poor Leaders Become Good Leaders,” Harvard Business Review, https://hbr.org/2013/02/how-poor-leaders-become-good-l
3 Darren Overfield and Rob Kaiser, “One Out of Every Two Managers Is Terrible at Accountability,” Harvard Business Review, https://hbr.org/2012/11/one-out-of-every-two-managers-is-terrible-at-accountability
4 Maren Hogan, “5 Employee Feedback Stats That You Need to See,” LinkedIn Talent Blog, https://business.linkedin.com/talent-solutions/blog/trends-and-research/2016/5-Employee-Feedback-Stats-That-You-Need-to-See
5 Avery Augustine, “5 Strategies That Will Turn Your Employees Into Leaders,” The Muse, https://www.themuse.com/advice/5-strategies-that-will-turn-your-employees-into-leaders

Why Choose Scranton for a Graduate Program?

Nationally Recognized Programs & Points of Pride

The University of Scranton is committed to providing excellent and rigorous graduate education through programs that will prepare you for careers. Students focus on their fields of specialization under the guidance of our top-notch faculty and benefit from our state-of-the-art technology and other resources.

Many of our graduate programs are nationally recognized for their quality and affordability:

  • U.S. News & World Report’sBest Colleges” has ranked The University of Scranton among the 10 top master’s universities in the North for 25 consecutive years.
  • Our MBA program was ranked among the top 15 in the nation for general management by Entrepreneur magazine and The Princeton Review.
  • Our master’s in health administration (MHA) program ranked No. 1 in the nation for full-time enrolled students in a list published by Modern Healthcare, a health care business weekly magazine.
  • In its 2019 “Best Graduate Schools” guidebook, U.S. News & World Report ranked several of The University of Scranton’s master’s degree programs among the best in the nation:
    Operations Management (15) Rehabilitation Counseling (24)
    Information Systems (20) Health Administration (42)
    Finance (23) Physical Therapy (53)
    Accounting (28) Occupational Therapy (58)
    Part-time MBA (74) Nurse Anesthesia (65)
  • Scranton’s online Master’s in Accountancy program was named Best in the Nation by Best Colleges, an independent online higher education resource.
  • U.S. News & World Report’s 2017 “Best Online Programs” ranked the University’s online MBA program No. 91 in the nation. The University’s graduate program in Education ranked No. 113.
  • Our MBA in Health Care Management program is ranked #25 by AffordableColleges.com in a list of the most affordable online master’s in healthcare management programs in the nation.  Scranton’s program stood out in both quality and affordability.
  • Scranton’s graduate Nursing program was recently ranked #98 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

To learn more about our graduate programs, click here.

A Father and Son’s Global Mindset Leads to MBAs at Scranton

When Sunil Pillai G’83, of Mumbai, India, was finishing up his MBA at Scranton at age 23, he promised himself that if he eventually got married and had a child, that child would go to Scranton for his or her MBA.

“God has been kind,” said Sunil in a recent interview. “I had one son. And his name is Rathin.”

It was pretty clear from early on that Rathin Pillai G’12, who, like his dad, grew up in Mumbai, would follow in his father’s footsteps.

“My dad had his framed final certification on the wall at home. He’d say to me, ‘That’s the degree that has gotten me this far. You can talk back to me all you want, but until you have that degree, I won’t listen,’” remembered Rathin.

Like Father, Like Son

Rathin had a lot to live up to. Sunil had gone from Scranton to Pfizer International in New York to Colgate Palmolive in India, quickly moving up the corporate ladder. He eventually became vice president of marketing and sales at CavinKare, a conglomerate in fast-moving consumer goods, then vice president of marketing at Reliance Communications, Global Operations, and, most recently, COO at Tata Teleservices. He is currently a guest faculty member at IIM Bangalore and founder and director of Strategy Green Consultancy.

“I owe this whole career of mine to Scranton and the education I got there,” said Sunil. “It got me to move from being just a young kid playing around in the streets of Mumbai to be a formative professional in the way I looked at things.”

Rathin, a TV executive who recently took on a strategy and business development role at India’s Network 18 (Viacom in the United States), said it was essential — for both of them — to go abroad for their graduate degrees.

“I think I speak for both of us when I say we needed a global perspective. Had we studied for our MBAs in India, it would’ve been specific to India marketing only,” he said.

Sunil and his son both chose Scranton because it had a good reputation, was a “friendly campus” and was close to major cities. Although the two graduated about 30 years apart, they had a campus friend in common — Murli Rajan, Ph.D. G’84, now interim dean of the Kania School of Management. Rajan was Sunil’s roommate in the ’80s and became a lifelong friend.

Paying it Forward

Sunil paid it forward when Rajan arrived in Scranton from India for his MBA just a year later. Rajan traveled directly from the airport to the Hotel Jermyn on Spruce Street, where the other international students were staying while they looked for more permanent housing.

“Sunil called me as soon as I got there. He found out where I was staying,” said Dr. Rajan. “I don’t even know how he did that. We spoke the same language; we both speak Tamil. I couldn’t believe it. He just made me feel so welcome.”

When Rathin arrived in 2010, he found out that his dad’s friend would be his adviser. Having that personal connection was a comfort to Rathin, but he said he felt on level with almost everyone at Scranton.

“I never felt alone on that campus or in Scranton in general,” said Rathin. “It’s not just the students; it’s the professors as well. They made me feel at home right from the start.”

Sunil said his own acceptance into the University community made it possible for him to focus on his studies and excel in his courses.

“I grew into a professional at Scranton,” said Sunil. “I learned to understand the world better.”

He expanded his global knowledge when he went on to work in India, the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore and East Africa. And now, as he sits in his house gazing out at the Arabian Sea, he looks back with pride at his experience in Scranton, where it all began.

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Learn more about the MBA program at The University of Scranton here!

This article originally appeared in The Scranton Journal.