Accounting Faculty Article Wins National Award

An article written by four University of Scranton accounting professors was awarded the inaugural Curt Verschoor Ethics Feature of the Year from the Institute of Management Accountants’ Committee on Ethics and Strategic Finance. The article, titled “The Value of Trust,” was written by Amanda S. Marcy, assistant professor of accounting; Douglas M. Boyle, D.B.A., chair of the University’s Accounting Department; James F. Boyle, D.B.A., assistant professor of accounting; and Daniel P. Mahoney, Ph.D., professor of accounting. The award highlights an article that focuses on the importance of ethics in business as a whole and finance and accounting in particular.

The new annual award is named in memory of Curtis C. Verschoor, a longtime member of the IMA Committee on Ethics, editor of the Strategic Finance Ethics column for 20 years, and a significant contributor to the development and revisions of the IMA Statement of Ethical Professional Practice. Verschoor was a passionate, renowned thought leader on ethics in accounting, having earned a Lifetime Achievement Award from Trust Across America-Trust Around the World for his leadership in and advocacy for trustworthy business practices.

Professor Marcy was named assistant professor of accounting at Scranton in 2018 and previously served as a faculty specialist in the department. She worked as an accountant for Baker Tilly Virchow Krause, LLP. She is a Certified Public Accountant and member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the American Accounting Association and the Healthcare Financial Management Association. Professor Marcy earned both a bachelor’s degree in accounting and an MBA specialized in accounting from The University of Scranton, and is currently pursuing her doctorate of business administration in accounting at the University.

Dr. Douglas Boyle serves as director of the University’s internationally recognized DBA program and the founder and director of the University’s Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program.

In addition, he, along with Dr. James Boyle and Dr. Mahoney, led the University’s effort to establish a Business High School Scholars Program. Articles written by these three professors have also won four Institute of Management Accountants’ “outstanding article of the year” medals, including two gold medals.

A Certified Public Accountant as well as a Certified Management Accountant, Dr. Douglas Boyle has more than 25 years of industry executive experience. An award-winning teacher, he was profiled in 2019 as one of just six “Professors to Know in Business Programs Based in the Northeast” selected by Bschools.org, an online resource for entrepreneurs.

Dr. Douglas Boyle’s research has been published in numerous academic and practitioner journals, such as The Journal of Accounting and Public Policy (JAPP), Accounting Horizons, Issues in Accounting Education, Current Issues in Auditing, The Journal of Accounting Education, The Accounting Educators’ Journal, The Journal of Accountancy, Strategic Finance, Fraud Magazine, Internal Auditor, Management Accounting Quarterly, The CPA Journal, Internal Auditing, The Journal of Applied Business Research and The Journal of Business and Behavioral Sciences. He earned a bachelor’s degree from The University of Scranton, an MBA from Columbia University and a doctorate from Kennesaw State University.

Dr. James Boyle has taught part-time at the University since 2009 and full-time since 2012 and also served as an internal auditor for the University for more than a decade. He has published articles in multiple academic journals, including The CPA Journal, Strategic Finance, The Journal of Forensic and Investigative Accounting and Internal Auditing. He holds a bachelor’s and MBA from The University of Scranton and a DBA from Kennesaw State University.

An award-winning teacher and scholar, Dr. Mahoney’s research has been published in numerous professional journals, such as The CPA JournalInternal Auditor, Management Accounting Quarterly and Journal of Business and Economics Research, Accounting and Financial Management. A Certified Public Accountant, he was named Kania School of Management’s Professor of the Year five times and has won numerous other awards for teaching. He earned a bachelor’s degree and an MBA from The University of Scranton as well as a doctorate in accounting from Syracuse University.

Interested in a DBA? Look no further!

AACSB recognized Scranton for providing a non-traditional research DBA in accounting that “promotes diversity and practice relevance by providing a flexible path for experienced practitioners to gain the knowledge and credentials required to succeed in tenure-track positions at AACSB accredited institutions.”

The University developed its DBA program in accounting in response to the pending shortage of accounting faculty, and The Pathways Commission on Accounting Higher Education of the American Accounting Association (AAA) and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants’ (AICPA) call to develop more flexible, non-traditional tracks to an accounting doctorate for experienced practitioners. AACSB also has recognized this need. Several Scranton accounting faculty members researched and published manuscripts in highly recognized journals, examining the national challenge as part of their research to develop the DBA program at the University. These journals included the Journal of Accountancy, Accounting Horizons, Strategic Finance, and Management Accounting Quarterly.

The University’s DBA program in accounting, launched in the fall of 2017, is a research degree that was developed specifically to provide experienced practitioners with a practical pathway to an academic career, while still providing for the development of the knowledge and skill set necessary to become a “scholarly academic,” that is one who is most qualified to serve in a tenure-track position at a school of business that possesses or is seeking formal accreditation by AACSB International.

Read the full story in The Scranton Ledger.

Learn more about the DBA program here.

Distinguished Faculty Members Recognized

Eleven University of Scranton faculty members were honored recently with Provost Faculty Enhancement awards for excellence in teaching, scholarship or service. The Office of the Provost and the Provost Advisory Group selected the recipients from a pool of candidates nominated by academic deans and department chairs.

The following award recipients teach graduate courses:

Douglas Boyle, D.B.A., received the Faculty Senate Excellence in Graduate Teaching Award, which recognizes a faculty member who demonstrates dedication to teaching graduate students in a manner that creates an encouraging and intellectually stimulating environment that promotes critical thinking and learning. Dr. Boyle, associate professor and chair of the Accounting Department, joined the faculty at the University in 2009. He earned his bachelor’s degree from The University of Scranton, his master’s degree from Columbia University and his D.B.A. from Kennesaw State University.


Marian Farrell, Ph.D., received the Excellence for University Service and Leadership Award, which recognizes faculty members who have contributed service to the University community, particularly those who demonstrate academic leadership by effectively mentoring their junior colleagues. Dr. Farrell, professor of nursing, joined the faculty at Scranton in 1990. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from College Misericordia, a second master’s degree from Syracuse University and her Ph.D. from Adelphia University.

 

 


Oliver Morgan, Ph.D., received the Excellence in Adapting Classic Principles of Jesuit Pedagogy into the Curriculum: Magis Award. Dr. Morgan, professor of counseling and human services, joined the faculty at Scranton in 1990. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Fordham University, his master’s degree from Hahnemann Medical University and his Master of Divinity degree from Weston School of Theology, and his Ph.D. from Boston University.

 


Learn more about our graduate programs!

Award Winning DBA Faculty!

University of Scranton accounting professor Douglas M. Boyle, D.B.A., was profiled as one of just six “Professors to Know in Business Programs Based in the Northeast” selected by Bschools.org, an online resource for entrepreneurs. The professors, who teach at business schools in the Northeast with online MBA programs, were selected based on their professional experience and knowledge.

An award-winning researcher and teacher, Dr. Boyle is chair of the University’s Accounting Department, director of the University’s DBA program and the founder and director of the University’s Nonprofit Leadership Certificate Program.

A Certified Public Accountant as well as a Certified Management Accountant, Dr. Boyle has more than 25 years of industry executive experience. He has served in executive roles in startup, middle market and Fortune 500 companies where he has held the positions of chief executive officer, president, chief operations officer and chief financial officer. He currently serves as chair of Allied Services Foundation’s Board of Directors.

At Scranton, Dr. Boyle was named the Kania School of Management’s (KSOM) Alperin Teaching Fellow for 2015 to 2018 and received the KSOM Advisory Board’s Award for Curriculum Innovation for 2017-2018. He has twice earned the KSOM Teacher of the Year award and earned the Provost Excellence Awards for the Scholarship of Teaching in 2014 and for Scholarly Publication in 2012. He was awarded the Outstanding Accounting Educator of the Year Award from the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants in 2015. In addition, three research papers he has authored with fellow KSOM faculty members have received the Institute of Management Accountants’ Lybrand Medals for “outstanding papers.”

Dr. Boyle earned his bachelor’s degree from The University of Scranton, a MBA from Columbia University and a doctorate from Kennesaw State University.

To learn more about the DBA program at The University of Scranton, click here!

How to Improve Your Organization

If there is one thing that has characterized the business landscape in the new millennium, it’s change. Disruptive new technologies such as 3-D printing, big data analytics and production line robotics are creating successful new businesses almost overnight, while some traditional business models have become obsolete. Many American companies are struggling to adapt.1

“Organizational change” is the new boardroom buzzword. Retailers are using online sales platforms. Factory owners are bringing in robotics. Suppliers are employing new software-driven inventory techniques. Companies must either adopt the new technologies or succumb to the competition.

Business executives are asking themselves how to make changes in the back office or production floor without alienating their staff.

Change by decree?

Many businesses seeking to adapt get off to an unsteady start because they initiate a change-by-decree strategy. There is a right and wrong way to reset a company’s culture, and authoritarian decrees such as, “Do it because I said so,” are rarely effective.

When leaders announce plans for new initiatives with little or no prior groundwork the effort fail before it begins.

“Forgetting that others in the organization haven’t been a part of the discussions and are not as familiar with all of the reasons for the change, leaders are surprised by the amount of resistance the new change generates,” say management consultants Ken and Scott Blanchard.2

The best way to proceed is from the top down, with company leaders showing themselves as prime exemplars of a new approach. From the start, senior leaders should embody the organization’s new approach, showing employees that real change is underway because it’s already happening at the top.

An appropriate way to motivate change in employees is to provide them with authentic communication about how the organization is proceeding and how it will benefit them. “In the absence of clear, factual communication, people tend to create their own information about the change, and rumors become facts,” the Blanchards say. Decision makers who simultaneously embody and demonstrate the benefits of change within the organization are less likely to face opposition and create a readiness for change before it is implemented.

The Importance of Involving Employees

Executives should plan their change initiatives like generals who prepare for a battle. Anticipate the obvious contingencies ─ the many questions about operations that staff members will have, for example ─ and be prepared to coach people through the process.

But don’t confuse endless PowerPoint presentations with actual communication, as one expert puts it. While meetings and processes can be helpful, they can’t replace meaningful face-to-face communication.

And don’t expect it to be easy. “Change is uncomfortable, and adapting to change is messy,” Fenson notes.

 

Click here for more information on Human Resources programs offered at The University of Scranton.

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Sources:

1 http://www.mckinsey.com/industries/high-tech/our-insights/digital-america-a-tale-of-the-haves-and-have-mores
2 http://www.fastcompany.com/3015083/leadership-now/6-steps-for-successfully-bringing-change-to-your-company
3 http://www.strategy-business.com/article/00255?gko=9d35b
4 http://www.inc.com/articles/2000/06/19312.html
5 https://www.boundless.com/management/textbooks/boundless-management-textbook/organizational-culture-and-innovation-4/managing-change-for-employees-40/strategies-for-successful-organizational-change-215-7289/