Winners of the 2022 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize Announced

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize

Gabrielle Allen is the winner of the 2022 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize in the Undergraduate Upper-level category, which is awarded to the winning project completed in a 200- to 400-level course.

Five people posed for a photo with person in the center holding a framed award
Donna Witek, Information Literacy Coordinator; Ann Romanosky, Occupational Therapy Department; Gabrielle Allen, Research Prize Winner; Victoria Castellanos, Dean of the Panuska College of Professional Studies; and George Aulisio, Dean of the Library

Gabrielle is a junior in the Occupational Therapy program who submitted to the competition her paper titled “The Effects of Exercise on Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder: An Evidence Review,” completed in the course OT 350: Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods, taught by Dr. Ann Romanosky. For her research, Gabrielle relied on what she had learned about database research starting in her first year at the University. She needed to consult fifty primary research studies, scholarly articles, or peer-reviewed papers about her topic of the effect of exercise on attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder; to do this, she identified three sub-topical areas of research which she could target in her searches. She also tracked her research using a spreadsheet designed to organize where she found the source, topical keywords for the source, inclusion and exclusion criteria, the APA citation for the source, and any directly quoted evidence she identified as useful to her review.

Through the research process, Gabrielle discovered new insights into her topic as well as the related research in her field. In her description of research, she shares: “I soon realized that there is not a lot of research [about this topic] authored by occupational therapists.” Rather than this be a deterrent to gathering evidence on the topic she identified, Gabrielle demonstrated persistence and saw it as an opportunity to further understand the ways her topic is researched in the field; she notes, “I learned that it is common for research teams to be interdisciplinary, rather than just focusing on one aspect of the team.” Gabrielle comments on her “trial-and-error mindset” as a researcher when “figuring out what method of research” worked for her, demonstrating flexibility and an open mind when researching. She concludes her description of research with her plans to design a research study on this topic, and when she does she “plan[s] to utilize the library’s resources to ensure [her] success in future research.”

Sponsoring faculty Dr. Ann Romanosky comments on Gabrielle’s work on the assignment: “This [Evidence Based Research] paper was labor intensive and required an understanding of research level quantitative statistics;” she goes on to share, “Gabrielle’s writing was clear and focused, [she] selected appropriate and current research, [and she] demonstrated great personal growth through this project.”

Honorable Mention awards in the Undergraduate Upper-level category were presented to Alexis Angstadt, a junior in the Occupational Therapy program, for her paper titled “The Efficacy of Combined Mirror Therapy and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Amputees with Phantom Limb Pain: An Evidence Review,” completed in the course OT 350: Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods for Dr. Carol Coté; and to Amanda Lauren Serafin, a senior Accounting and Business Analytics double major, who submitted her honors project titled “Integrating ESG into the Accounting Curriculum: Insights from Accounting Educators,” completed in the course ACC 489H: ESG/CSR Reporting Research for Prof. Ashley Stampone.

Colleen Berry, Jamie Hreniuk, Bryan Gorczyca, and Nicholas Capobianco are the winners of the 2022 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize in the Graduate category.

Two people posed holding a framed award
Lori Walton, Physical Therapy Department, who accepted the Graduate Research Prize on behalf of winners Colleen Berry, Jamie Hreniuk, Bryan Gorczyca, and Nicholas Capobianco; and George Aulisio, Dean of the Library

Colleen, Jamie, Bryan, and Nicholas are third-year students completing their studies in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program. They submitted to the competition their project titled “The Effectiveness of Complementary/Alternative Medicine for Pain Management in Postpartum Women: A Systematic Review,” completed in the course PT 773: Scientific Inquiry III for PT, taught by Dr. Renée Hakim. The group members used the Library’s resources to explore topics related to vulnerable populations and landed on the use of complementary/alternative medicine for pain management in postpartum women. They met with a faculty librarian to develop a search string that would capture the research they were interested in which they used to search in the library databases in their field, identifying 483 possible articles to review. The Library’s efficient InterLibrary Loan service was critical to their success in accessing and reviewing the articles they identified. Using the citation management platform Zotero and related strategies they also learned in their meeting with a librarian, the researchers narrowed to 22 articles which they proceeded to include in their qualitative analysis of the topic.

This group of researchers went on to have an abstract accepted for presentation at the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Combined Sections Meeting. In their description of research, they share the centrality of the Library in the success of their research: “The resources available through the Weinberg Memorial Library made it possible to conduct thorough research with clinically relevant applications that physical therapists may share with their patients, community, friends, and family” and that “the process of preliminary literature review, article searching and accessing, and compilation of findings would not be possible without the robust resources available through the Weinberg Memorial Library.”

Sponsoring faculty Dr. Renée Hakim commends the student researchers who produced this project and shares, “All group members mastered the methodology through a series of progress reports and revisions which occurred over three consecutive semesters. Their work was very high quality as confirmed by the peer-review process which resulted in acceptance to a national scientific meeting.  I am very proud of their accomplishments.”

Corinne Rose Smith is the winner of the 2022 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize in the Undergraduate Foundational category, which is awarded to the winning project completed in a 100-level course.

Three people posed for a photo with person in the center holding a framed award
Donna Witek, Information Literacy Coordinator; Corinne Rose Smith, Research Prize Winner; and George Aulisio, Dean of the Library

Corinne is a Nursing major who submitted to the competition her paper titled “Aspirin: Your Body’s Best Friend or Enemy?,” completed in Prof. Dawn D’Aries Zera’s WRTG 107: Composition course. Tasked with researching an argumentative contemporary issue related to her major, Corinne chose the topic of aspirin and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. During an information literacy class taught by a faculty librarian, Corinne learned to combine brainstormed keywords in her database searches; apply search filters to limit the source criteria to scholarly, peer-reviewed articles published in the last eight years; and critically evaluate the sources she found. In her description of research, Corinne explains in doing this she  “decided what the purpose of each source was, where it was published, and why it was useful.” She then created a source log, in which she documented the information she learned from each source and which precise portions of the source gave her that information.

These demonstrated methods of research and the information gathering process led Corinne to meaningful insights into the role of research in writing and her wider academic career. In her description of research she shares: “I have learned a stronger researcher makes a stronger writer. … While I initially felt overwhelmed at the start of my research process, I found the library’s extensive resources, tools, and services eased the process tremendously.” She offers the metaphor of a traveler to describe the research process, describing “a traveler who journeys from source to source to discover new insights.” She notes the role of curiosity in the research process when she admits, “The more information I found, the more intrigued I became with the topic.” And she shares how work on this paper will extend to her further academic research pursuits when she says, “I believe my ability to write a strong paper has improved tremendously,” where for her the research process is like “taking part in an adventure that could potentially change the face of the future.”

Sponsoring faculty Prof. Dawn D’Aries Zera comments on Corinne’s project and shares, “As Corinne accumulated knowledge during her research process, she also became more conscientious of the importance of knowing the entirety of an issue … Corinne’s dedication to applying lessons learned throughout her first year at the University has resulted in a well-researched, timely paper which appeals to a general audience.”

An Honorable Mention award in the Undergraduate Foundational category was presented to Sarah Boyle, a Counseling and Human Services and Accounting major, for her paper titled “The Population Below the Poverty Line” completed in her CHS 111: Intro to Human Adjustment course for Dr. Paul Datti.

Currently celebrating its 11th year, the Weinberg Memorial Library inaugurated the Library Research Prize in 2011 to recognize excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge of the methods of research and the information gathering process, and use of library resources, tools, and services. In 2017, the prize was named for Professor Emerita Bonnie W. Oldham, who founded the prize at the University in 2011. The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize was fully endowed in 2019 and consists of a prize of $500 awarded to winning projects in each of the three categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level projects), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level projects), and Graduate.

Prize winners were honored at a reception on Thursday, May 12, 2022 in the Charles Kratz Scranton Heritage Room of the Weinberg Memorial Library.

Information about the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize can be found on the website: http://www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Four people posed for a photo with two people in the center holding framed awards
2022 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize Honorees: Amanda Lauren Serafin, Honorable Mention; Corinne Rose Smith, Winner; Gabrielle Allen, Winner; and Alexis Angstadt, Honorable Mention

Congratulations to all of our honorees!

One Week Left! – Application Deadline for Library Research Prize is Monday, May 2, 2022

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize

There is one week left to apply for the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize! Project submissions for Intersession and Spring 2022 are due Monday, May 2, 2022 by 4:00 pm.

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize recognizes excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process and use of library resources, tools, and services.

Three prizes of $500.00 each will be awarded to the winning individual student or group in the following categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level courses), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level courses), and Graduate. If won by a group, the award will be split equally among the group members. All you need to do is write a 500- to 700-word essay describing your research process and how you used the Library in completing the project. Click here for some tips on how to craft the best 500- to 700-word essay you can about your research. 

A statement of faculty support from the instructor who assigned the research project is also required for each submission.

Winners will be announced in May after the deadline for Intersession and Spring projects. Although there are two different dates to submit an application, only one judging will take place.

For additional information on how to apply, what to include in a completed application, and to access the application, visit the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize page: www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Apply Now for the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize

Are you working on a research project this semester? Did you use the library’s resources, services, collections, or spaces in order to complete your research? Then the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize is for you!

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize recognizes excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process and use of library resources, tools, and services.

Three prizes of $500.00 each will be awarded to the winning individual student or group in the following categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level courses), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level courses), and Graduate. If won by a group, the award will be split equally among the group members. All you need to do is write a 500- to 700-word essay describing your research process and how you used the Library in completing the project. Click here for some tips on how to craft the best 500- to 700-word essay you can about your research. 

The application deadline for projects completed during Intersession or Spring 2022 is Monday, May 2, 2022 at 4:00 pm.

A statement of faculty support from the instructor who assigned the research project is also required for each submission.

For additional information on how to apply, what to include in a completed application, and to access the application, visit the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize page: www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

One Week Left! – Application Deadline for Library Research Prize is Monday, December 13, 2021

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize

There is one week left to apply for the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize! Project submissions for Summer and Fall 2021 are due Monday, December 13, 2021 by 4:00 pm.

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize recognizes excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process and use of library resources, tools, and services.

Three prizes of $500.00 each will be awarded to the winning individual student or group in the following categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level courses), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level courses), and Graduate. If won by a group, the award will be split equally among the group members. All you need to do is write a 500- to 700-word essay describing your research process and how you used the Library in completing the project. Click here for some tips on how to craft the best 500- to 700-word essay you can about your research. 

A statement of faculty support from the instructor who assigned the research project is also required for each submission.

Winners will be announced in May after the deadline for Intersession and Spring projects. Although there are two different dates to submit an application, only one judging will take place.

For additional information on how to apply, what to include in a completed application, and to access the application, visit the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize page: www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Apply Now for the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize

Are you working on a research project this semester? Did you use the library’s resources, services, collections, or spaces in order to complete your research? Then the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize is for you!

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize recognizes excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process and use of library resources, tools, and services.

Three prizes of $500.00 each will be awarded to the winning individual student or group in the following categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level courses), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level courses), and Graduate. If won by a group, the award will be split equally among the group members. All you need to do is write a 500- to 700-word essay describing your research process and how you used the Library in completing the project. Click here for some tips on how to craft the best 500- to 700-word essay you can about your research. 

The application deadline for projects completed during Summer or Fall 2021 is Monday, December 13, 2021 at 4:00 pm.

A statement of faculty support from the instructor who assigned the research project is also required for each submission.

For additional information on how to apply, what to include in a completed application, and to access the application, visit the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize page: www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Winners of the 2021 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize Announced

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize

Sophia N. Visaggio is the winner of the 2021 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize in the Undergraduate Upper-level category, which is awarded to the winning project completed in a 200- to 400-level course.

Undergraduate Upper-level Winner Photograph
Sophia N. Visaggio, Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize Winner in the Undergraduate Upper-level Category

Sophia is a sophomore Occupational Therapy major with a minor in Psychology from Wantagh, New York, who submitted the project “Interventions for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder,” completed in the course OT 250: Scientific Writing and Information Literacy, taught by Dr. Julie Nastasi. Sophia began her research process after information literacy instruction to her class by a librarian, through which she learned techniques for searching within the EBSCO database CINAHL with Full Text, including how to adjust search criteria to meet her research and topical needs. She maintained an electronic file with a chart in which she logged her progress so she could recreate her searches later in the research process, and as an aid in her organization and analysis of sources. She also notes how her increased understanding of her topic will help her in different parts of her life, both professional and personal.

But perhaps most important in Sophia’s work on this project was the change in her disposition toward research; as she shares in her description of research:

“When researching my topic of interventions for ADHD, I felt accomplished when I found an article that was perfect for my paper. I was surprised how a task I once feared now brought me a sense of enjoyment from successfully scouring the database and finding exactly what I needed. … Now being able to retrospectively look back on this once terrifying task, I am proud of my growth in both accessing the library’s databases as well as my analysis and writing skills. What began as a task I dreaded and could not wait to be done with became a journey of researching and writing that I found enjoyable so much so that I did not mind the amount of work I put into perfecting my paper.”

Sponsoring faculty Dr. Julie Nastasi comments on the quality of Sophia’s work and shares, “Sophia conducted a literature review and synthesized the types of interventions used in occupational therapy practice for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Her research is extremely impressive because she has not had clinical practice courses at this point in the curriculum. She identified appropriate interventions and was able to report the findings in literature to use in clinical practice.”

Currently celebrating its 10th year, the Weinberg Memorial Library inaugurated the prize in 2011 to recognize excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge of the methods of research and the information gathering process, and use of library resources, tools, and services. In 2017, the prize was named for Professor Emerita Bonnie W. Oldham, who founded the prize at the University in 2011. The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize was fully endowed in 2019 and consists of a prize of $500 awarded to winning projects in each of the three categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level projects), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level projects), and Graduate.

Honorable Mention awards in the Undergraduate Upper-level category were presented to Sydney L. Gero, a sophomore Criminal Justice major and Counseling and Human Services minor, for the project, “An Empirical Study on Cybercrime and COVID-19,” completed in CJ 386H: Cybercrime and COVID-19 for Dr. Sinchul Back; and to Jessica Goldschlager, a junior with majors in Neuroscience and Hispanic Studies, for the project, “El trauma histórico y la comunidad latinx,” completed in SPAN 335: Service and the Hispanic Community for Dr. Roxana Curiel.

Amanda Trumpore, Elizabeth DiGiovine, Kayla Brown, and Emily Harvan are the winners of the 2021 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize in the Graduate category.

Graduate Category Prize Winners Photograph
Top Row: Amanda Trumpore, Elizabeth DiGiovine; Bottom Row: Kayla Brown, Emily Harvan; Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize Winners in the Graduate Category

Amanda, Elizabeth, Kayla, and Emily are students in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program, who are from Warren, New Jersey, Shavertown, Pennsylvania, Stockholm, New Jersey, and Cranford, New Jersey, respectively. Together they submitted to the competition the group project “Effects of Music on HR and BP on Patients in the ICU: A Meta-Analysis,” completed in the course sequence PT 771/772/773: Scientific Inquiry in Physical Therapy, taught by Dr. Renée Hakim. This project was a systematic review conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) format. Group members relied on expert instruction by a librarian in search, e.g., how to use MeSH terms in PubMed, and bibliographic management, e.g., collaborative citation organization and analysis using Zotero. They also used the Library’s efficient Interlibrary Loan (ILL) services to successfully conduct their review of 182 studies which were culled down to 18 from which they extracted data “to determine the impact of music on the vital signs of patients in the ICU.”

The group comments on the iterative and collaborative nature of the research process in their description of research when they share:

“Our group learned many lessons throughout this project with the help of both the library and our department faculty. Although we anticipated that the process of conducting a systematic review would be straightforward, we discovered that implementing the procedure involves considerable trial and error and team cooperation. We had to change our search terms many times to obtain an appropriate search yield …”

Sponsoring faculty Dr. Renée Hakim commended this project for being accepted for presentation at a national scientific meeting (American Physical Therapy Association’s Combined Sections Meeting, February 2021), and notes that “At the start of the project, the students knew very little about the design methodology and library resources. By the end of the project, they completed a quality study which is considered the highest level of evidence (OCEBM [Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine]),” and that “This application of information literacy will be applied by these students as life-long learners to maintain best practice as future health care professionals.”

Jonathan R. Wells is the winner of the 2021 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize in the Undergraduate Foundational category, which is awarded to the winning project completed in a 100-level course.

Undergraduate Foundational Winner Photograph
Jonathan R. Wells, Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize Winner in the Undergraduate Foundational Category

Jonathan is a first-year Biology major from Long Valley, New Jersey, who submitted to the competition the project “The Surprising Reality of Middle Eastern Tourism,” completed in Prof. Charles Kratz’s WRTG 107: Composition course. He investigated his topic in both the Library’s resources, primarily in the EBSCOhost database Academic Search Elite and the ProQuest Central database, and in credible web sources such as the Jordan Investment Commission (jic.gov.jo). He also developed the structure of his paper in response to the information he found in the databases about his topic, shaping his subsequent searches based on the new things he learned about his topic along the way.

In his description of research, Jonathan offers a metaphor for the research process that illustrates his developed understanding of research when he shares:

“Through an evolving research process, I developed a greater understanding of the process of gathering information. An analogy I like to use is that research is synonymous to mining. You have a target ore that you would like to find; however, in the process of trying to find that ore, you will come across other valuable types of rocks. My research process relates to this idea, because when I was researching my topic, I started out with target ideas, and ended up with other valuable information that helped me create a strong informative essay. This allowed me to understand the importance of starting with broad searches, and narrowing down on more specific subtopics.”

Sponsoring faculty Prof. Charles Kratz comments on Jonathan’s project and shares, “Jonathan did excellent work in defining a clear research process using Weinberg Library resources. The strength of his work came in how he revised his research process along the way. His topic and the information gathering process became very important to him. He especially enjoyed the new sense of discovery the research process provided him.”

An Honorable Mention award in the Undergraduate Foundational category was presented to Charles C. Sylvester, a first-year Environmental Science major with a minor in Classical Languages, for the project “The Age of the Electric Vehicle has Come,” completed in WRTG 107: Composition for Prof. Dawn D’Aries Zera.

Due to the impact of COVID-19 on campus operations, in lieu of an in-person awards reception prize winners received their awards in May.

Information about the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize can be found on the website: http://www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Congratulations to all of our honorees!

One Week Left! – Application Deadline for Library Research Prize is Monday, May 3, 2021

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize

There is one week left to apply for the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize! Project submissions for Intersession and Spring 2021 are due Monday, May 3, 2021 by 4:00 pm.

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize recognizes excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process and use of library resources, tools, and services.

Three prizes of $500.00 each will be awarded to the winning individual student and/or group in the following categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level courses), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level courses), and Graduate. If won by a group, the award will be split equally among the group members. All you need to do is write a 500- to 700-word essay describing your research process and how you used the library in completing the project. Click here for some tips on how to craft the best 500- to 700-word essay you can about your research.

A statement of faculty support from the instructor who assigned the research project is also required for each submission.

Winners will be announced in May, and although there will be no in-person reception and awards ceremony for the 2020-2021 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize due to the impact of COVID-19 on campus operations, we look forward to honoring our winners in other ways.

For additional information on how to apply, what to include in a completed application, and to access the application, visit the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize page:  www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Apply Now for the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize

Are you working on a research project this semester? Did you use the library’s resources, services, collections, or spaces in order to complete your research? Then the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize is for you!

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize recognizes excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process and use of library resources, tools, and services.

Three prizes of $500.00 each will be awarded to the winning individual student or group in the following categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level courses), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level courses), and Graduate. If won by a group, the award will be split equally among the group members. All you need to do is write a 500- to 700-word essay describing your research process and how you used the library in completing the project. Click here for some tips on how to craft the best 500- to 700-word essay you can about your research. 

The application deadline for projects completed during Intersession or Spring 2021 is Monday, May 3, 2021 at 4:00 pm.

A statement of faculty support from the instructor who assigned the research project is also required for each submission.

For additional information on how to apply, what to include in a completed application, and to access the application, visit the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize page: www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Winners of the 2020 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize Announced

Katherine R. Burke is the winner of the 2020 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize in the Undergraduate Upper-level category, which is awarded to the winning project completed in a 200- to 400-level course.

Kat is a 26-year-old Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania native currently enrolled part-time in the Philosophy program, who submitted the project “Towards an Ethics of Gendered Difference,” completed in the course PHIL 382: Care Ethics in Japanese Film, taught by Prof. George Aulisio. For her research, Kat’s starting point was two primary works on the ethics of care which she read through the lens of gender-expansivity; this process then led her first to the Library’s Philosophy and humanities databases, and then to the Library’s interlibrary loan request platforms through which she was able to track down the key sources cited in the primary works that served as her project’s focus.

Kat learned valuable lessons about research and writing by immersing herself in sources both adjacent and central to the focus of her project; she shares in her description of research,

“…immersing myself in the works of those who had already parsed texts like those I was focusing on shed light on how one can boil down key concepts from a given work and where one’s focus should lie in philosophical texts.” Commenting on the ease of use of our interlibrary loan services, she notes, “Using these services made me really understand that even though research is rigorous and often challenging, the tools we have at our disposal help to make it a much more efficient – and enjoyable – process.”

Sponsoring faculty Prof. George Aulisio observed that Kat “learned the importance of digesting philosophy slowly, re-reading at length the ideas of philosophers until everything is fully comprehended” as well as “the value of carrying on an academic discussion (i.e., Scholarship as Conversation)” and “how much value that adds to one’s own knowledge and knowledge creation.”

The Weinberg Memorial Library inaugurated the prize in 2011 to recognize excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge of the methods of research and the information gathering process, and use of library resources, tools, and services. In 2017, the prize was named for Professor Emerita Bonnie W. Oldham, who founded the prize at the University in 2011. The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize was fully endowed in 2019 and consists of a prize of $500 awarded to winning projects in each of the three categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level projects), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level projects), and Graduate.

An Honorable Mention award in the Undergraduate Upper-level category was presented to Sarah White, a sophomore Biology and Philosophy double major, for the project, “Constrained Women, Authoritarian Men, and Gender-Based Medical Treatments: Unequal Gender Roles and a Tragic Descent into Madness in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s ‘The Yellow Wall-paper’,” completed in the course ENLT 265J: The American Literary Experience for Dr. Leonard Gougeon.

Liam Mulvaney is the winner of the 2020 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize in the Graduate category.

Liam is a graduate occupational therapy student from Jenkintown, Pennsylvania, who submitted to the competition the project “Historical Analysis: A Century of Progress in Adaptive Equipment,” completed in the course OT 501: Leadership in Occupational Therapy, taught by Dr. Marlene Morgan. For this project, Liam took advantage of the Library’s digital resources, including CINAHL, PubMed, and ProQuest Central, as well as the Library’s physical resources, such as the print books on reserve, microfilm, and various foundational Occupational Therapy journals, in order to research and conduct a historical reflective analysis of adaptive equipment in the field of Occupational Therapy.

He notes that the online library research guide for this course as well as the library staff were especially helpful as he conducted the complex research for this project. In his description of research, he shares that “citation chasing” was the most beneficial advanced research technique he learned and applied in this project, and that he

“became a better student and researcher as a result of the library’s staff and resources.”

Sponsoring faculty Dr. Marlene Morgan commended Liam for his use of patents and illustrations of adaptive equipment in his project, and praised his project by noting that “Systematic reflection of how leadership in OT has successfully created and sustained a meaningful role in the development and use of adaptive equipment in the past will provide us with strategies to face the future.”

Honorable Mention awards in the Graduate category were presented to Melissa Busch, graduate student in the Occupational Therapy program, for the project, “Occupational Therapy in the Hospital,” also completed in the course OT 501: Leadership in Occupational Therapy for Dr. Marlene Morgan; and to group partners Emily Gilinger, Tyler Huggins, Brian Gargiulo, and Joshua Taylor, graduate students in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program, for their project, “Recreational Activities Impact on Activity and Participation in Persons with Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review,” completed in the course PT 772/773: Scientific Inquiry II/III in Physical Therapy for Dr. Renée Hakim.

Eryn Boken is the winner of the 2020 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize in the Undergraduate Foundational category, which is awarded to the winning project completed in a 100-level course.

Eryn is a sophomore Kinesiology major from Los Angeles, California, who submitted to the competition the project “Coronavirus Concerns for the U.S. Economy,” completed in Prof. Dawn D’Aries Zera’s WRTG 107: Composition course. She primarily used the EBSCOhost database Academic Search Elite and the CREDO Reference search tool to search for information about the 2019 novel coronavirus, COVID-19, and through this process found that studying the economic impact of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) that spread in 2002 was a valuable research strategy for better understanding the current impact of the developing COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. She also focused her search strategy as she went, taking keywords from initial articles she found and using them to run subsequent searches in the databases for more information about her project’s focus.

Eryn eloquently captures the research process in her description of research when she shares:

“Looking at where my research first began, how it developed, and the bibliography I ended with, I noticed the journey I had to take throughout the process. I was constantly learning something new each time I entered the database portal and therefore had to adjust the information I wanted to use accordingly. Especially with all the tools the library has to offer us, where you begin the research is certainly not where you will end.”

Sponsoring faculty Prof. Dawn D’Aries Zera says of Eryn that “She seemed to get a lot of joy out of the discovery involved with research — following leads and paths to get answers. This student kept turning over rocks to find more information and wasn’t satisfied with just the first thing that turned up. The thing about this particular issue, too, is that the information was true news, and therefore kept changing — sometimes within the same day!”

Honorable Mention awards in the Undergraduate Foundational category were presented to sophomore Psychology major Brayden Druger for the project “Preliminary Military Health Screenings: Are They Worth It?” completed in WRTG 107: Composition for Prof. Dawn D’Aries Zera; and to first-year Biology major Sydney Youngblood for the project “To Heal or To Kill,” also completed in WRTG 107: Composition for Prof. Dawn D’Aries Zera.

Due to the impact of COVID-19 on the Spring semester, in lieu of an in-person awards reception prize winners were mailed their awards at the end of May.

Information about the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize can be found on the website: http://www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Congratulations to all of our honorees!

One Week Left! – Application Deadline for Library Research Prize is Monday, May 11, 2020

One week left to apply for the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize! Project submissions for Intersession and Spring 2020 are due Monday, May 11, 2020 by 4:00 pm.

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize recognizes excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process and use of library resources, tools, and services.

Three prizes of $500.00 each will be awarded to the winning individual student and/or group in the following categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level courses), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level courses), and Graduate. If won by a group, the award will be split equally among the group members. All you need to do is write a 500- to 700-word essay describing your research process and how you used the library in completing the project. Click here for some tips on how to craft the best 500- to 700-word essay you can about your research. 

Note: The deadline for Intersession and Spring 2020 project submissions has been extended to Monday, May 11, 2020 at 4:00 pm due to the impact of COVID-19 on the Spring 2020 semester. In addition, there will be no in-person reception and awards ceremony for the 2019-2020 Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize, but we look forward to honoring our winners in other ways.

A statement of faculty support from the instructor who assigned the research project is also required for each submission.

For additional information on how to apply, what to include in a completed application, and to access the application, visit the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize page: www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Questions can be directed to Donna Witek, Information Literacy Coordinator, at donna.witek@scranton.edu.