Game Night this Thursday!

The Library will be hosting a Game Night in the Reilly Learning Commons on Thursday, October 11th from 6:30-10PM. Some of the games available are MarioKart, Super Smash Bros., Rock Band, Just Dance, and a variety of new and exciting board games!

Have games of your own? Students are encouraged to bring their favorite board games and card games to enjoy with friends!

Free Pizza, Soda, and Snacks will be provided! All students are invited to join in the fun!

Sponsored by the Weinberg Memorial Library and the University of Scranton Gaming Club

Game Night on October 11th!

The Library will be hosting a Game Night in the Reilly Learning Commons on Thursday, October 11th from 6:30-10PM. Some of the games available are MarioKart, Super Smash Bros., Rock Band, Just Dance, and a variety of new and exciting board games!

Have games of your own? Students are encouraged to bring their favorite board games and card games to enjoy with friends!

Free Pizza, Soda, and Snacks will be provided! All students are invited to join in the fun!

Sponsored by the Weinberg Memorial Library and the University of Scranton Gaming Club

Apply Now for the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize!

Are you working on a research project this semester? Did you use the library’s resources, services, collections, or spaces in order to complete your research? Then the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize is for you!

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize recognizes excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process and use of library resources, tools, and services.

New this year:  Three prizes of $500.00 each will be awarded to the winning individual student and/or group in the following categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level courses), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level courses), and Graduate. If won by a group, the award will be split equally among the group members. All you need to do is write a 500- to 700-word essay describing your research process and how you used the library in completing the project. Click here for some tips on how to craft the best 500- to 700-word essay you can about your research. 

The application deadline for projects completed during Intersession or Spring 2018 is Monday, April 30, 2018 at 4:00 pm. Winners will be announced at the end of the Spring 2018 semester.

A statement of faculty support from the instructor who assigned the research project is also required for each submission.

For additional information on how to apply, what to include in a completed application, and to access the application, visit the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize page:  www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Apply Now for the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize!

Are you working on a research project this semester? Did you use the library’s resources, services, collections, or spaces in order to complete your research? Then the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize is for you!

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize recognizes excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process and use of library resources, tools, and services.

New this year:  Three prizes of $500.00 each will be awarded to the winning individual student and/or group in the following categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level courses), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level courses), and Graduate. If won by a group, the award will be split equally among the group members. All you need to do is write a 500- to 700-word essay describing your research process and how you used the library in completing the project. Click here for some tips on how to craft the best 500- to 700-word essay you can about your research. 

The application deadline for projects completed during Intersession or Spring 2018 is Monday, April 30, 2018 at 4:00 pm. Winners will be announced at the end of the Spring 2018 semester.

A statement of faculty support from the instructor who assigned the research project is also required for each submission.

For additional information on how to apply, what to include in a completed application, and to access the application, visit the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize page:  www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

Library Game Night on Thursday!

The Library will be hosting a Game Night in the Reilly Learning Commons on Thursday, March 1 from 6:30-10PM. Some of the games available are MarioKart, Super Smash Bros., Just Dance, Rock Band 3, and a variety of board games.

Have games of your own? Students are encouraged to bring their favorite board games and card games to enjoy with friends!

Free Pizza, Soda, and Snacks will be provided! All students are invited to join in the fun!

Sponsored by the Weinberg Memorial Library and the University of Scranton Gaming Club

Library Game Night on March 1st

The Library will be hosting a Game Night in the Reilly Learning Commons on Thursday, March 1 from 6:30-10PM. Some of the games available are MarioKart, Super Smash Bros., Just Dance, Rock Band 3, and a variety of board games.

Have games of your own? Students are encouraged to bring their favorite board games and card games to enjoy with friends!

Free Pizza, Soda, and Snacks will be provided! All students are invited to join in the fun!

Sponsored by the Weinberg Memorial Library and the University of Scranton Gaming Club

Apply Now for the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize!

Are you working on a research project this semester? Did you use the library’s resources, services, collections, or spaces in order to complete your research? Then the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize is for you!

The Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize recognizes excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge in the methods of research and the information gathering process and use of library resources, tools, and services.

New this year:  Three prizes of $500.00 each will be awarded to the winning individual student and/or group in the following categories: Undergraduate Foundational (100-level courses), Undergraduate Upper-level (200- to 400-level courses), and Graduate. If won by a group, the award will be split equally among the group members. All you need to do is write a 500- to 700-word essay describing your research process and how you used the library in completing the project. Click here for some tips on how to craft the best 500- to 700-word essay you can about your research. 

The application deadline for projects completed in Summer or Fall 2017 is Monday, December 4, 2017 at 4:00 pm. There will be another deadline for Spring 2018 research projects. Winners will be announced at the end of the Spring 2018 semester.

A statement of faculty support from the instructor who assigned the research project is also required for each submission.

For additional information on how to apply, what to include in a completed application, and to access the application, visit the Bonnie W. Oldham Library Research Prize page:  www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

18th Century Liturgical Books

A selection of rare materials from McHugh Special Collections is currently on view in the Library’s 5th floor Heritage Room. This week we are highlighting three 18th century liturgical books (2 breviaries and a missal) from the exhibit “From Medieval to Modern”. These books are special for their ecclesiastical coats of arms and elaborate decorated bindings.

The first is the Diurnale Ebroicense (1740) by Pierre Jules César de Rochechouart (1698-1781), a French ecclesiastical man who served as Bishop of Evreux and then as Bishop of Bayeux. A Diurnale is a condensed version of a breviary, and in this case, the summer volume Pars Aestiva, from Pentecost though the 15th Sunday after Pentecost. However, this volume also contains sections for the autumn.  The Diurnale Ebroicense is based on the rites practiced in Ebroicense, also known as Évreux, a diocese in northern France. This red leather binding features the coat of arms of an unidentified ecclesiastical, possibly a Bishop.

The next is the Breviarium Romanum (1740), which is a very elaborately decorated breviary that features repeating floral designs on red leather, gilt edges, and the arms of an unidentified ecclesiastical, possibly a Bishop. Finally, there is the Canon Missae. Canon Missae is the name used in the Roman Missal for the fundamental part of the Mass that comes after the Offertory and before the Communion. This impressive volume was printed at the Vatican in 1784. The engraving of the Last Supper was engraved by Carolus Grandi after an original by Joseph Passarus. The ornate gold-tooled binding features rather large floral tools that would have required significant strength to impress into the leather. It also features the arms of an unidentified ecclesiastical, possibly a Bishop.

Cover: Rochechouart, Pierre J. C. Diurnale Ebroicense, 1740
Cover: Catholic Church. Breviarium Romanum, 1740.
Cover: Catholic Church. Canon Missae, 1784.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To read more about the Weinberg Library’s Rare Book Collection visit our collection page here. “From Medieval to Modern” will be on display during normal library hours through Tuesday, April 25. On Tuesday, April 11th, Special Collections Librarian Michael Knies will discuss the exhibit at 6 p.m. in the Heritage Room of the Library. A reception will immediately follow the talk. This event is free and open to the public.  For more information, please email michael.knies@scranton.edu or call 570- 941-6341.

From Medieval to Modern: The Book of Hours

A selection of rare materials from McHugh Special Collections is currently on view in the Library’s 5th floor Heritage Room. This week we are highlighting the Book of Hours from the exhibit “From Medieval to Modern”.

The Book of Hours was a Christian devotional book that became popular in northern Europe during the 14th century and has been called the Medieval best seller as many educated men and women owned them. The Book of Hours was a distillation, for laypeople, of the series of prayers said by priests, monks, nuns, etc. during the course of the day divided into sections from morning through the night. Although containing a similar collection of texts, prayers, and psalms, there is a high variation in quality depending on the budget of the purchaser. As result, each manuscript was unique with its illumination and binding. Most examples are small books with little illumination, often restricted to decorated capital letters at the start of psalms and prayers. However, the books made for the wealthy can be extremely lavish and heavily illuminated with full-page decorations and have extravagantly decorated bindings.

On display in the Heritage Room are several examples of the Book of Hours from Special Collections: two medieval leafs, a simple book, and a fine art facsimile. The first leaf is from a fine Book of Hours with inhabited borders (ca. 1440). The second leaf is from an undistinguished Book of Hours (ca. 1450-75), but has significance because it records information in French on the Dumesnil family from Loire.

Leaf from a fine Book of Hours with inhabited borders, France, ca. 1440.
Book of Hours, French Flanders, Circa 1450-75.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is a Book of Hours (1685) bound in a simple blind ruled black Morocco. This binding has an unfortunately added shelfmark in addition to damaging adhesive tape. Finally, there is a fine art facsimile of a miniature, illuminated Book of Hours from the Vatican Library in brown leather with raised bands and gilt decoration.

Officium Beatæ Mariæ Virginis, Nuper Reformatum … Cum Indulgentius & Orationibus A Pio V. Ordinatis, & Hymnis Ab Vrbano Viii. Correctis. Accedunt Psalmi Vesperarum & Completorij, Etc. Antuerpiæ: ex Officina Plantiniana, 1685.
Fine Art Facsimile: Thomas, Marcel. Livre D’heures Vat. Ross. 94: Fin Du Xvème Siècle. Fribourg: Éditions d’art Ebory, 1984.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To read more about the Weinberg Library’s Rare Book Collection visit our collection page here. “From Medieval to Modern” will be on display during normal library hours through Tuesday, April 25. On Tuesday, April 11th, Special Collections Librarian Michael Knies will discuss the exhibit at 6 p.m. in the Heritage Room of the Library. A reception will immediately follow the talk. This event is free and open to the public.  For more information, please email michael.knies@scranton.edu or call 570- 941-6341.

 

Fine Art Facsimiles: The Book of Kells and The Lindisfarne Gospels

A selection of rare materials from McHugh Special Collections is currently on view in the Library’s 5th floor Heritage Room. This week we are highlighting two fine art facsimiles from the exhibit “From Medieval to Modern”: The Book of Kells and The Lindisfarne Gospels.

In 1997, Special Collections acquired a fine art facsimile of the Book of Kells, donated by the estate of Charles J. Buckley, a dean emeritus who served the University in a variety of academic and administrative positions for 46 years.

Folio 34r contains the Chi Rho monogram, which serves as the incipit for the narrative of the life of Christ. Chi and rho are the first two letters of the word Christ in Greek.

The original Book of Kells is believed to have been created around 800AD on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. Since the 17th century, it has been stored in the Library of Trinity College in Dublin. It is one of the world’s most famous illuminated manuscripts and is considered one of the greatest artistic productions of the Medieval period. The Book of Kells is a masterwork of Western calligraphy and represents the pinnacle of Insular illumination. It is also widely regarded as Ireland’s finest national treasure. The illustrations and ornamentation of the Book of Kells surpass that of other Insular Gospel books in extravagance and complexity. The decoration combines traditional Christian iconography with the ornate swirling motifs typical of Insular art. Figures of humans, animals and mythical beasts, together with Celtic knots and interlacing patterns in vibrant colors, enliven the manuscript’s pages. Many of these minor decorative elements are imbued with Christian symbolism and so further emphasize the themes of the major illustrations.

Only 1,480 copies of the facsimile of the Book of Kells were produced by the Fine Art Facsimile Publishers of Switzerland. The facsimile is owned by some of the most prestigious institutions in the United States, including New York’s Morgan Library and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The facsimile edition took 10 years to produce and is considered to be indistinguishable from the original under museum viewing conditions. This accuracy extends to duplicating any damage and holes that appear in the original. The pages of the facsimile are identical in size and shape to the original manuscript pages. Of most importance to the viewer, however, is the impeccable color reproduction of the photographs. A special photographic book cradle was manufactured to hold the original safely. Kodak Ektachrome color transparencies were color corrected electronically, then passed to a lithographer who made additional color corrections by hand using as many as 10 printing inks per page. As the lithographer perfected the color balance, examples of the pages were compared with the original to fine-tune the color. After the pages were duplicated, they were sewn into gatherings hand-bound in a white skin, a book construction similar to the original.

On display in the Heritage Room: Folio 129v, the Evangelist symbols for the Gospel of Mark.
On display in the Heritage room: Folio 130r, the celebratory opening of the Gospel of Mark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Weinberg Memorial Library Special Collections recently received an extraordinary gift in honor of the 20th anniversary of the Library. Dr. Midori Yamanouchi, Friends of the Weinberg Memorial Library Board Member, provided funding for the acquisition of a fine art facsimile of the Lindisfarne Gospels. The original Lindisfarne Gospels is at the British Library in London and it is one of the most important and one of the best-preserved early medieval manuscripts.

The Lindisfarne Gospels is an Illuminated manuscript gospel book created approximately 715-720 AD in a monastery at Lindisfarne off the coast of England. It is considered one of the best early versions of St. Jerome’s Latin Vulgate. The Lindisfarne Gospels also includes an interlinear Old English translation of the Gospels. This word-for-word English gloss was added to the Gospels around 950-970 AD.  It is the oldest known translation of the Gospels into English.

The fine art facsimile of the Lindisfarne Gospels was produced in 2002 by Faksimile Verlag of Luzern Switzerland, a company that specializes in the highest quality reproductions of liturgical medieval manuscripts. The facsimile was produced in cooperation with the British Library using state of the art digital photographic technology.

On display in the Heritage Room: Folio 138v, the Carpet Page of the Gospel of Saint Luke.
On display in the Heritage Room: Folio 139r, the opening of the Gospel of Saint Luke.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To read more about the Weinberg Library’s Rare Book Collection visit our collection page here. “From Medieval to Modern” will be on display during normal library hours through Tuesday, April 25. On Tuesday, April 11th, Special Collections Librarian Michael Knies will discuss the exhibit at 6 p.m. in the Heritage Room of the Library. A reception will immediately follow the talk. This event is free and open to the public.  For more information, please email michael.knies@scranton.edu or call 570- 941-6341.