Angels in the Outfield

For baseball fans here at the University of Scranton, this story will be of particular interest. Did you know that the movie Angels in the Outfield was based on a story by Richard Conlin, pseudonym of Father Richard F. Grady, S.J. (1905-1989), who was Chair of the English Department and Dean of the Evening School here at the University of Scranton?
The story began as a 98-page radio comedy written by Father Grady and was sold to M-G-M Studios. Singer and Catholic celebrity Bing Crosby, a Pirates owner, and Branch Rickey, general manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates, made the deal for the story and secured extensive filming rights in the City of Pittsburgh.

The 1951 movie was directed by Clarence Brown starring Paul Douglas and Janet Leigh, just 21 at the time. Action shots were filmed at Forbes Field in April 1951 and include the University of Pittsburgh’s Cathedral of Learning and cameo roles by Ty Cobb, Joe DiMaggio, Ralph Kiner, and Bing Crosby. Ellen Corby, later of The Waltons, is the orphanage Mother Superior.
The Walt Disney Company remade the movie in 1994, moving the team to Anaheim, home of the California Angels (the current Los Angeles Angels). Weinberg Library has DVD copies of both versions of the film, M-G-M’s 1951 version, and Walt Disney’s 1994 version. They are available for check out from the Media Resources Collection located on the 3rd floor.

Angels in the outfield (1951) / PN1995.9.S67 A54 2007

Angels in the outfield (1994) / PN1995.9.B28 A55 2002

 

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Library Research Prize Winners!

Chrissy and Marjorie3Christina Gavalas and Marjorie Toron, seniors in the Occupational Therapy program, are the winners of the 2016 Library Research Prize for Undergraduate students. They completed a group project for OT 494: Evidence-Based Research.

The Weinberg Memorial Library inaugurated the prize in 2011 to recognize excellence in research projects that show evidence of significant knowledge of the methods of research and the information gathering process, and use of library resources, tools, and services.

Honorable Mention awards in the undergraduate category included Alyssa Rodemann, a senior Psychology major; Emily Pocius, a junior English major; and Tim Zinna, a sophomore Finance major.

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The winner of the 2016 Library Research Prize for Graduate students is Allison Ferullo. She is a student in the Nurse Anesthesia Graduate Program and is certified as a Critical Care Registered Nurse (CCRN) as well as in Trauma Nursing Critical Care. Her individual project for NURS 593: Research Methodology was a literature review on distractions in the operating room.

Prize winners were honored at a reception on Thursday, May 12, 2016 in the Heritage Room of the Weinberg Memorial Library.

Information about the Library Research Prize can be found on the website: http://www.scranton.edu/libraryresearchprize

University of Scranton Faculty Scholarship Exhibit

  This month the Weinberg Memorial Library is hosting its annual Faculty Scholarship Exhibit in the Library’s 5th floor Heritage Room. The exhibit features books, journal articles, and presentations produced by University of Scranton faculty members since 2015. The exhibit, organized … Continue reading






Congratulations to Barb Evans and Sharon Finnerty

Today Barb and Sharon joined an exclusive club at the University. They are now officially members of the 10-year employee contingent at Scranton. The two were among the 37 employees from the faculty and staff, as well as ARAMark and the Bookstore, who were honored at a luncheon in the Rose Room of Brennan Hall. They received a certificate, pin, and long-stemmed white rose to mark the occasion. Later this month, Michael Knies will mark a special milestone at the University as well. On May 20, Michael will be inducted into the Pro Do et Universitate Society, commemorating his twentieth anniversary of service to the Weinberg Library. Please offer your best wishes to Barb, Sharon, and Michael as they celebrate their accomplishments!

5.06 ~ The University of Scranton’s Day of Giving

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Don’t judge a book by its cover.

More than just books, the Weinberg Memorial Library is a central hub for collaboration, technology, art, research, and even coffee breaks. Scranton students have 24-hour access to this campus hotspot, as well as 24-hour online access to thousands of special collections and digital resources.

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Thanks to Friends like you, the Weinberg Memorial Library is able to grow the number of resources available on campus and online each year. Today, on The University of Scranton’s Day of Giving, consider making your 5.06 gift to the Library.

Buy a Book on 5.06!
Did you know it costs $75 to add one book to the campus collection? With a gift of $75 or more today, a nameplate will be added to a book in your honor.

MAKE MY 5.06 GIFT

WML 306 – Open Lab for Students

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Beginning Sunday, May 1, 2016, the computer lab in the Weinberg Memorial Library – WML 306 – will be an open computer lab for student use during regular Library Hours. Open lab status last day will be Friday, May 20, 2016.

Print jobs can be sent to either the print station on the second floor, the print station in the ProDeo Room, or either of the printers in the Reilly Room.

Friends Book Sale This Weekend

20156 bpThe Friends of the Weinberg Memorial Library book sale is almost here.  Volunteers, faculty, and staff are preparing for our annual sale which supports our collections and services.  The event will be the last weekend of April with a special preview sale for Friends members and Schemel Forum members on Friday, April 29.

The library will accept any hardcover or paperback books in good condition, including children’s books, cookbooks, fiction, and non-fiction. In addition, the library is collecting media and tag sale items.

Donations may be placed in the boxes on the Monroe Avenue side of the library. Donations will be accepted until Wednesday, April 27.

This year’s book sale is scheduled for Saturday, April 30, from 9 a.m. until 8 p.m., and Sunday, May 1, from noon until 4 p.m., in the fifth floor Heritage Room of the Weinberg Memorial Library.   Join the organization if you would like to take advantage of the special preview.

For additional information or to volunteer, please contact Barbara Evans at 570-941-4078.

THE THIRD ANNUAL JAY NATHAN, PH.D. VISITING SCHOLAR LECTURE SERIES

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THE THIRD ANNUAL JAY NATHAN, PH.D.

VISITING SCHOLAR LECTURE SERIES

Tuesday, April 26, 2016, 5:30 PM
The Moskovitz Theater, The DeNaples Center, 4th Floor
The University of Scranton

Free and Open to the Public
Click Here to RSVP

For additional information, call the Weinberg Memorial Library at 570-941-7816 or email kym.fetsko@scranton.edu

This free event, which also will include a showcase of Thai art and culture, entertainment and a reception offering Thai delicacies, is all made possible through the generosity of Dr. Nathan, who divides his time between Scranton and New York, where he is a tenured full professor of management at St. John’s University in Queens. He was previously a tenured professor in the University’s Kania School of Management.

The honored guests, with similarly distinguished backgrounds, will bring a perspective to campus that is unique to emerging democracies and will highlight their own research while discussing timely topics of interest to students, faculty and the community at large.

In addition to Dr. Nathan, the panelists are:

▪ The Honorable Pornpong Kanittanon, the Royal Thai Consul General, who previously held multiple Secretary positions in the departments of Protocol, Political Affairs, East Asian Affairs and Information and worked in the Royal Thai Embassies in Indonesia, Japan and the Republic of Korea;

▪ Napadol Thongmee, consul of the Thai Trade Center, who also has held top positions in several Royal Thai Embassies across the globe and has spent 28 years in government service, representing Thai interests in Milan, Italy, Mexico City, Mexico, and Tehran, Iran;

▪ Srimala Waraphaskul, a 22-plus-year executive with the Tourism Authority of Thailand, or TAT, who is responsible for integrated marketing communications, advertising and trade outreach and promotional campaigns to increase arrivals to Thailand from the United States’ Eastern Seaboard;

▪ Korbsiri Iamsuri, director of the Thailand Board of Investment, who promotes North American investment in Thailand as part of the Thailand Board of Investment in New York City.

12,876 University of Scranton Records Now Available in the Digital Public Library of America

Last week at DPLAFest in Washington, DC, executive director Dan Cohen announced that the Digital Public Library of America had grown in its third year to include more than 13 million records. We’re proud to announce that 12,876 of those records were contributed by the University of Scranton Weinberg Memorial Library.

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Launched in 2013, DPLA is a digital platform and network that brings together descriptive information for rare and unique digital materials from more than 1,900 libraries, archives, and museums across the country. It’s a portal to the treasures of American cultural heritage, from digitized photographs, films, documents, and objects to born digital ebooks, video, and images. All of these materials are freely available on the web for use by researchers, students, teachers, genealogists, and the general public.

We’ve been building digital collections at the University of Scranton since 2008, and nearly all of our materials are already publicly available on our website at www.scranton.edu/library/digitalcollections (some items are restricted due to copyright, privacy, or donor request). So why participate in DPLA?

DPLA doesn’t host digital materials – they’re all stored and made accessible by contributing institutions like us, so it’s still our job to keep digitizing, describing, preserving, and publishing digital items. What DPLA does is make these materials discoverable and usable in entirely new and exciting ways. Metadata records (descriptive information) that we send to DPLA are aggregated into a stream of open data that can be used by software developers and others to create new tools or visualizations. Two of our favorites are the DPLA Visual Search Prototype and Culture Collage, which offer more visual interfaces for browsing and sorting through search results.

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(We also get a kick out of Term vs. Term, which compares the number of DPLA search results for two phrases. You know, like Scranton vs. Wilkes-Barre. Just saying.)

termvstermPerhaps most importantly, DPLA allows for unified access, which is important both for 1) users who don’t necessarily know what institution will have the records they’re looking for and 2) collections that have been physically fragmented across different institutions.

An example of the former might be a genealogist looking for information about family members from Scranton. Using DPLA, they can find not only relevant materials in our collections (like our yearbooks and Aquinas issues, which are excellent sources for information about our alumni) but they’ll also stumble across photographs, manuscripts, and books from the Lackawanna Valley Digital Archives, postcards from the Boston Public Library, stereographs and menus from the New York Public Library, and genealogical books from the Library of Congress.

An example of the latter is the Horace G. Healey Collection, an impressive set of 19th century penmanship and calligraphy. Half of the collection is available here on campus in our McHugh Special Collections (as part of our Zaner-Bloser Penmanship Collection), but the other half is at the New York Public Library. In DPLA, images of the artwork are reunited as they are digitized.

Our participation in DPLA has been in the works for almost two years. DPLA is unable to accept metadata records directly from individual libraries – there are just too many potential contributors! – so almost all of its data passes through nodes called Service Hubs. Most service hubs are established at a state or regional level, and Pennsylvania didn’t have one when DPLA first launched. Beginning in August 2014, a group of Pennsylvania cultural heritage institutions got together to discuss how best to collaborate on digital collections in the state. After a year of planning, coordination, and tons of work, the PA Digital Partnership was approved as a DPLA Service Hub in August 2015. On April 13, 2016, data from the PA Digital Partnership went live in DPLA, with 131, 651 records from 19 contributing Pennsylvania institutions.We’re incredibly proud to be part of DPLA and the PA Digital Partnership, and we’re thrilled to see our digital collections be more accessible and discoverable than ever. Congratulations to all our PA Digital colleagues, and happy searching to all!