Technology On Your Own Terms

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Everything You Wanted to Know About Drones, But Were Afraid to Ask!

Thursday, November 13, 2014
12:00-1:00PM in WML 305

Presenters: Lee DeAngelis & John Culkin (UofS Senior Systems Administrators)

What are the benefits of unmanned aerial vehicles, aka drones, in today’s world? How does drone technology work? Why are drones so controversial? Presenters will display some of their recent video. Weather permitting, they will give a live demonstrate outside, taking some pictures and video. A light lunch will be provided.

This session is open to all University faculty and staff, but seats are limited, so please let us know you are coming. You can register at www.scranton.edu/ctleregistration – under Technology on Your Own Terms.

 

The International Film Series Presents: The Little Girl who Sold the Sun

 

The Little Girl who Sold the Sun
Photo courtesy of California Newsreel.

The International Film Series presents a free screening of The Little Girl Who Sold the Sun (La Petite Vendeuse de Soleil) on Wednesday November 19th at 7 p.m. in the Moskovitz Theater in The DeNaples Center. Dr. Annie Hounsokou will lead a discussion following the film.

Set in Dakar, Senegal The Little Girl Who Sold the Sun is director Djibril Diop Mambety’s tribute to street children. It tells the story of Sili Lam, a resilient twelve year old paraplegic who is the lone girl in the competitive world of male newspaper vendors. With the local policeman suspicious of her good fortune when she sells all her newspapers and the newsboys taunting her, can Sili persevere and rise above her difficult circumstances?

The Little Girl Who Sold the Sun is in Wolof with English subtitles.

This event is open to faculty, staff, students and the public. Please email sharon.finnerty@scranton.edu for more information.

Film series sponsored by a University of Scranton Diversity Initiative Grant through the Office of Equity and Diversity.

Scranton Reads: Movie Night: The Pit and the Pendulum

Pit and pendMovie Poster
Photo courtesy of MGM.

Just in time for Halloween, Scranton Reads and the Weinberg Memorial Library present a free screening of Roger Corman’s suspenseful adaptation of Edgar Allen Poe’s short story The Pit and the Pendulum.

Vincent Price delivers a bone chilling performance as Nicholas Medina, the son of a member of the Spanish Inquisition, who is haunted by the mysterious death of his wife. Set in a moody Spanish castle this 1961 box office hit is full of betrayal and plot twists.

Join us on Friday October 17, 2014 at 7 p.m. in Room 305 of the Weinberg Memorial Library. Kevin Norris will lead a discussion following the film.

This screening is being held in conjunction with the  Lackawanna County Library Scranton Reads event and is open to the public.

Contact sharon.finnerty@scranton.edu for information.

Library Exhibit: “Through the Lens: A Compassionate Look Back at Our Future”

Through the Lens Library Digital Signage

Now through November 26, the Library’s fifth floor Heritage Room is hosting a traveling exhibit showcasing the social justice photography of Linda Panetta. The images and stories presented by Photojournalist Linda Panetta will take audiences on a moving journey, challenging their own reality of the world as they experience the joy, beauty, hope and sorrow of people affected by violence, sanctions, and misguided foreign policy.

Over the past 25 years, Panetta has traveled throughout Latin America and the Middle East using her firsthand knowledge and experiences in impoverished – war torn areas of the world, including Guatemala, Colombia, Nicaragua, (Chiapas) Mexico, El Salvador, Haití, Argentina, Chile, Perú, Uruguay, Ecuador, Panamá, Venezuela, Afghanistan, Iraq and Palestine, to advocate for environmental, economic and social justice. In her work, she captures the daily realities of life of the people she advocates for with the goal of raising public awareness about world events and the cost of war and its “collateral damage”.

“When looking through the lens of a camera, you’re ever so present to the details of one’s face: the smirks, smiles and frowns; the wisdom and age that accompany the sun baked wrinkles, a depth of sorrow, joy, uncertainty,  curiosity and oneness in the eyes.” – Panetta

Panetta’s vivid photographs speak volumes and inspire others to act. Throughout the exhibit and talk (slide presentation), you will see and hear the prevailing sense of hope for a better tomorrow as inspired by the individuals in her photographs. Catch a glimpse of the world around you and its very soul in photojournalist’s Linda Panetta’s rousing stories and images.

Along with the exhibit held in the Heritage Room there are other events scheduled. Last Friday Ms. Panetta also hosted a First Friday Scranton event at the Connell Building where she exhibited a different set of photographs.

Tonight, October 6, Ms. Panetta will do a public presentation titled: Latin America Through the Lens: A Compassionate Look Back at Our Future. The lecture will be held at 7pm in theMcIlhenny Ballroom on the fourth floor of the DeNaples Center. The event is free and open to the public.

The exhibit and lecture are made possible by a grant from The University of Scranton Office of Equity and Diversity, Diversity Initiatives and the generous support of the Latin American and Women’s Studies, the Weinberg Memorial Library, University Ministries, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Office of Community Relations and the Office of Equity and Diversity

To view a collection of Panetta’s photography visit: www.OpticalRealities.org

Contact Michael Knies 570-941-6341 Michael.Knies@Scranton.edu for more information on the exhibit.

Contact Karl Kretsch 570- 941-4729 Karl.Kretsch@scranton.edu for more information on the lecture.

The International Film Series Presents “Beauty and the Beast”

BeautyandBeast3
Photo courtesy of Societe Nouvelle.

Please join us on Tuesday October 21, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. in the Moskovitz Theater in the DeNaples Center for a free presentation of Jean Cocteau’s live action adaptation of Beauty and the Beast. Mr. Peter Tafuri will lead a discussion after the film.

If you’ve only seen the animated version of this fairy tale, come see Jean Cocteau’s 1946 French adaptation for a unique film experience. When Belle’s father is imprisoned by the Beast for picking a rose from the Beast’s garden, Belle bravely takes her father’s place and a magical adventure follows.

Beauty and the Beast is in French with English subtitles.

This event is open to faculty, staff, students and the public. Please email sharon.finnerty@scranton.edu for more information.

Film series sponsored by a University of Scranton Diversity Initiative Grant through the Office of Equity and Diversity.

 

Technology on Your Own Terms – Fall 2014 Workshops

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On behalf of the Weinberg Memorial Library and the Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence, we invite University of Scranton faculty and staff to our FAll 2014 Technology On Your Own Terms (TOYOT) workshops. Here’s what we’ve got planned for this semester:

Vendor Fair
Wednesday, September 17 & Thursday, September 18
10am-12pm and 1-3pm in the Reilly Learning Commons

The Vendor Fair will be held both days in the Reilly Learning Commons, which is on the first floor of the Weinberg Library. Some of the Library’s major information providers, including: ProQuest, Springer, Elsevier, EBSCO, ebrary, etc. will be on campus to show interested faculty, staff, and students how these products can meet their research needs as well as answer any questions they may might have about using these resources for their research.

This event will be kicked off with a Ribbon Cutting and Grand Opening for the Reilly Learning Commons on Wednesday at 10am. Coffee, tea, and light refreshments will be served. No registration is required for this TOYOT event!

Everything You Wanted to Know About Drones, But Were Afraid to Ask!

Thursday, November 13, 2014 – 12:00-1:00PM in WML 305
Presenters: Lee DeAngelis & John Culkin (UofS Senior Systems Administrators)

What are the benefits of unmanned aerial vehicles, aka drones, in today’s world? How does drone technology work? Why are drones so controversial? Presenters will display some of their recent video. Weather permitting, they will give a live demonstrate outside, taking some pictures and video.

This session is open to all University faculty and staff, but seats are limited, so please let us know you are coming. You can register at www.scranton.edu/ctleregistration – under Technology on Your Own Terms.

Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month: Art Exhibit

Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month Exhibit_001

To celebrate the national Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month of May, Asian Studies in collaboration of Weinberg Memorial Library is hosting an art exhibit in the Library’s 5th floor Heritage Room. These art posters from Smithsonian Museums are both educational and visual-stunning. They give a historical account of the journeys of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans–their struggles, contribution, and challenges.

 

About Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month:

May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month, a celebration of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. A rather broad term, Asian-Pacific encompasses all of the Asian continent and the Pacific islands of Melanesia (New Guinea, New Caledonia, Vanuatu, Fiji and the Solomon Islands), Micronesia (Marianas, Guam, Wake Island, Palau, Marshall Islands, Kiribati, Nauru and the Federated States of Micronesia) and Polynesia (New Zealand, Hawaiian Islands, Rotuma, Midway Islands, Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, Cook Islands, French Polynesia and Easter Island).

Like most commemorative months, Asian-Pacific Heritage Month originated in a congressional bill. In June 1977, Reps. Frank Horton of New York and Norman Y. Mineta of California introduced a House resolution that called upon the president to proclaim the first ten days of May as Asian-Pacific Heritage Week. The following month, senators Daniel Inouye and Spark Matsunaga introduced a similar bill in the Senate. Both were passed. On October 5, 1978, President Jimmy Carter signed a Joint Resolution designating the annual celebration. Twelve years later, President George H.W. Bush signed an extension making the week-long celebration into a month-long celebration. In 1992, the official designation of May as Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month was signed into law.

The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States on May 7, 1843, and to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. The majority of the workers who laid the tracks were Chinese immigrants.

Co-sponsors: Asian Studies Program and Weinberg Memorial Library. Special thanks to Professor Michael Knies, Dr. Linda Ledford-Miller, and Ms. Julee Modzelewski.

May 1-31 Library Art Exhibit. Heritage Room, 5th fl., Weinberg Memorial Library.

Free during library hours. For more information, call 570-941-7643.

Contact:

Ann Pang-White
Email: ann.pang-white@scranton.edu
Phone: 570-941-7643
Website: Click to Visit

The International Film Series Presents: Waiting for Happiness

waiting_for-happiness_poster_01
Image courtesy of New Yorker Films.

Please join us on Friday May 2, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. in Room 305 of the Weinberg Memorial Library for a free presentation of the Mauritanian/French drama Waiting for Happiness.  Dr. Annie Hounsokou will lead an engaging discussion following the film.

New Yorker Films describes Waiting for Happiness as the story of the diverse people of the small transit city of Nouadhibou in Mauritania which serves as a resting stop for people from all over the world. The lives of its inhabitants are pared down to two basic choices: adaptation or exile. In the latter category is Abdallah, a citified college student who temporarily returns home and, unable to speak or dress like a native, becomes painfully, comically alienated. Opposed to him is Khatra, an alert, curious boy apprenticed to the wizardly local electrician, who demonstrates how apparent oppositions (such as magic and technology, tradition and modernity) might be reconciled through improvisation and patience. Waiting for Happiness spins its overlapping stories and intersecting characters into a prismatic cascade of enigmas, epiphanies, deadpan gags, and haunting images: a light bulb glowing in the middle of the desert, a low window disclosing passersby from the knees down, huge ships bobbing in the offshore haze with the tantalizing promise of distant happiness.

 Directed by Abderrahmane Sissako Waiting for Happiness is in French and Hassanya with English subtitles.

This event is open to faculty, staff, students and the public. Please email sharon.finnerty@scranton.edu for reservations.

 

 

Environmental Art Show Now Open!

art show reception 2014

 

The Environmental Art Show is now open to the public and will be available for viewing during the library’s regular hours. There will be a Reception on Wednesday, April 23rd from 5-7PM. Please join us for light refreshments and the opportunity to meet with the artists and other environmental art enthusiasts. The show will come down on Thursday April 24 by Noon.