Jay Nathan, Ph.D., Visiting Scholar Lecture Series – Mongolia: History, Culture & Transformation

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Please register at: www.regonline.com/2015JayNathanLecture

Free & Open to the Public

The Jay Nathan, Ph.D., Visiting Scholar Lecture Series

The Jay Nathan, Ph.D., Visiting Scholar Lecture Series invites international scholars from economically challenged and politically suppressed nations to visit the University of Scranton to address issues that will enlighten and benefit students, faculty and the community-at-large. Its purpose is to enrich the intellectual life or share a cultural exposition in the arts or music for both The University of Scranton and our Northeastern Pennsylvania community. This annual lecture initiative will highlight the research and contributions of guest scholars of international repute who will visit the University to discuss timely and timeless subjects. While visiting campus, scholars will deliver presentations on topics of interest to the academic community and meet informally with attendees, students and faculty.

Celebrating Our Towns: Lackawanna County Centennial Books and Community Histories

Our friends over at the Lackawanna Valley Digital Archives (LVDA) have just announced a new digital collection of local history materials:

Celebrating Our Towns—Lackawanna County Centennial Books and Community Histories is a collection of books honoring Lackawanna county towns, townships, boroughs, cities and areas.  These books were published by local authors and centennial groups to celebrate their towns.  This wonderful collection was made possible by a grant from the Willary Foundation.

One of our favorites is the Historical Booklet and Guide from Scranton’s Diamond Jubilee and Centennial celebration in 1941. Nearby towns represented in the collection include Archbald, Carbondale, Clarks Summit, Dunmore, Olyphant, and Throop, among several others.

Library Requests Book Donations and Volunteers

The University of Scranton’s Weinberg Memorial Library is requesting book and tag sale donations for its annual spring book sale, as well as volunteers to help with preparation and staffing for the event, which will take place during the last weekend of April. All proceeds from the book sale benefit the Friends of the Weinberg Memorial Library Endowment, which supports library collections and services.

The library will accept all titles of used hardcover and paperback books, including children’s books, cookbooks, fiction and non-fiction. In addition, the library is collecting videos, compact discs, audio-cassettes, records and tag sale items.

This year’s book sale is scheduled for Saturday, April 26 from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m., and Sunday, April 27, from noon until 4 p.m., in the fifth floor Heritage Room of the Weinberg Memorial Library.

Donations may be placed in the boxes on the Monroe Avenue side of the library, and will be accepted until Wednesday, April 23.

This year’s book sale is scheduled for Saturday, April 26 from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m., and Sunday, April 27, from noon until 4 p.m., in the fifth floor Heritage Room of the Weinberg Memorial Library. The Friends of the Weinberg Memorial Library, the library staff and volunteers will conduct the event. Book prices begin at $1.00 in addition to specialty priced items.

A special preview sale will be held on Friday, April 25, for Friends’ members and Schemel Forum members.

For additional information or to volunteer, please contact Barbara Evans, circulation/access service clerk for the library, at 570-941-4078.

The International Film Series Presents: The General

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Photo courtesy of Kino Lorber.

What do you do when the love of your life and your beloved locomotive are stolen from you by enemy troops?   If you’re Buster Keaton, you deliver laughs and excitement while doing whatever it takes to recover what is yours!
The General is a 1926 silent film set in the midst of the American Civil War. Keaton plays Johnny Gray, an engineer whose train, The General, is stolen by Northern spies while the lovely Annabelle Lee is on board. Gray embarks on a daring adventure to save the day.

 Consistently ranked among the greatest films ever made, The General, captures the visual aspects of the Civil War while being thoroughly entertaining. 

 Join us for this free event on Friday October 18, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in Room 305 of the Weinberg Memorial Library.  Kevin Norris will lead a discussion following the film. 

This screening is being held in conjunction with the Lackawanna County Library System’s Scranton Reads event and is open to the public.

 Contact Sharon Finnerty at sharon.finnerty@scranton.edu for reservations.

Librarian Sheli McHugh featured in Scranton Journal

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McHughArticleProf. Sheli McHugh is featured in the Scranton Journal for her volunteer work with Scranton Reads, the city’s community reading initiative. Prof. McHugh has been a member of the Scranton Reads committee since 2006. Scranton Reads is jointly sponsored by the City of Scranton and the Albright Memorial Library.

Please click here to read the full article.

Call for Artists

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The library will be hosting the 3rd Annual Environmental Art Show during the University’s Earth Week Celebration (April 18-25). The purpose of the Art Show is to showcase the artistic talents of our students, staff, and faculty while promoting sustainability and the environment.

As always the Art Show is comprised solely of University of Scranton student, staff, and faculty submissions, so the success of the show relies on the number of submissions we receive. All types of artwork are accepted for display in the Art Show, but they must be your own creation, and they must be environmentally themed. Our definition of “environmentally themed” is understood very liberally and includes: nature scenes, animals, environmental degradation, sustainability messages, recycled goods, and so on.

Please consider submitting to the show before April 12 and attending the Art Show’s Reception on Monday April 22 from 5-7 pm. All submissions will be returned to the artists before the end of the Spring semester.

Trail Clean-up

The Weinberg’s Green Team participated in a trail clean-up Saturday morning along their adopted section of the LHVA Heritage Trail. The team worked for two hours and made it through half the trail.  In that short amount of time, they succeeded in filling 9 bags of garbage, several bags of recycling, a pile of metal, and a tire! Their adopted section is the CNJ portion and runs from 7th Avenue, along the South Side Sports Complex, to Elm St. The team will be planning more clean-ups in the future. Visit our Flickr page for more pictures from Saturday!

Earth Week 2011 Wrap-up and Green Team First Year in Review

This year marked the second year the library celebrated Earth Week in order to raise awareness about sustainable issues…

Even though I’m happy to report our structural engineering skills have improved from 2010; unfortunately, our sustainable use of paper did not. However, the increase paper usage is likely because all computer labs on campus have eliminated student printing. Considering almost all students (excluding personal printers) were sent to the library to do their printing, its probably safe to say our “paper awareness” and educational outreach efforts  throughout the year had probably payed off.

The good news is that immediately after Earth Week we installed double sided printers throughout the building. Part of the credit for double sided printers should be given to the anonymous student who wrote on our 2010 Earth Week student suggestion page which asked “How should the library Go Green in 2010?”

For Earth Week 2012 we fully expect the paper tower to be a fraction of the size of it’s ancestors thanks to a combination of duplex printing and outreach by the Green Team.

The “wasted paper” display is a tough comparison for a number of reasons. In 2010, we didn’t have the clearly labeled WedgeCycle recycling bins throughout the building and by and large most people weren’t sorting their recyclables. So, paper that otherwise might have ended up in a trash last year is now being properly placed in a paper recycling bin this year. Also, this year we did 10 days worth of recycling whereas last year we did 7 days.

Speaking qualitatively, it would seem that this years “wasted paper” display was an improvement over last years. It was approximately the same amount of paper, but there was no trash mixed in with the paper.

Curbing the amount of wasted paper, unnecessarily duplicated prints, and print jobs left at the printers is definitely a priority for the Green Team.

New for 2011, we had a Craft Night where students, staff, and faculty had a chance to come to the library to make Origami figures out of reused book covers. Pictured above is a display of some of our masterpieces.

This year we hosted our first ever Environmental Art Show as an alternative way to educate about sustainable issues and to reach out to the community. Considering this was our first time hosting an Art Show, we think it turned out pretty good. We are looking forward to see what Environmentally themed art our Students, Staff, and Faculty will have prepared for next years Environmental Art Show! Click the following link for more pictures from the Reception for the Environmental Art Show.

In this poster we displayed all of the library Green Team’s many accomplishments. Some of which include the selling of Reusable Water bottles at the same price it cost us to make them, the installation of a Water Bottle Filling Station, the installation of double-sided printers, tri-colored recycling bins, the adoption of a section of the LHVA’s Heritage trail, collaborating with the Communications department to make Sustainability PSAs which air on our TVs, and collaborating with students for their poster board session at the University’s Sustainability Fair.

The Green Team knows it has a lot of work to do if we are going to to accomplish as much as we did in our first year, but we welcome the challenge!

Hands on Civil War History

We’re in the Scranton Times-Tribune today!  Many thanks to reporter Josh McAuliffe and photographer Michael Mullen for sharing the story of our exciting Civil War project.  Here’s what it’s all about:

This semester, students from Dr. Kathryn Shively Meier‘s Civil War and Reconstruction class (HIST314) partnered up with the Weinberg Memorial Library, the Lackawanna Historical Society, and the Everhart Museum to get a hands-on feel for local Civil War history.  Dr. Meier designed the class project in collaboration with Digital Services Librarian Kristen Yarmey to give the students a taste of what life as a historian, curator, or archivist is like while they simultaneously learned about the experience of the common man during the Civil War.

The class project kicked off with a visit to the Everhart’s exhibit “With bullets singing all around me”: Regional Stories of the Civil War, where the students got to chat with curator Nezka Pfeifer about how the exhibit came together.  The class of 33 students, most of whom are history majors, then split up into five groups, each with a specific task.  The first group worked at the Historical Society with executive director Mary Ann Moran-Savakinus and Pennsylvania Conservation Corps member Sara Strain, going through genealogical files to search for original, Civil-War era correspondence.  A second group of students focused on preserving those found letters in appropriate archival storage and prepared them to be lent to the Weinberg Library.

A third group of students spent time here at the Weinberg, digitizing the found letters and describing them.  The fourth group of students got a primer in 19th century handwriting from Dr. Meier and is currently working on transcribing the documents.  A final, fifth group of students will design a web page layout to interpret the digitized letters for the public.

The end result of the project will be a set of fully searchable, digitized, Scranton-related Civil War documents.  These documents will all be made freely available to the public as part of a local collaborative digital history collection called “Out of the Wilderness,” hosted by the Albright Memorial Library.

A Wave to 100

This week The Abington Journal included an article, “A Wave to 100” by Joan Mead-Matsui, that features Annette Barosi Kalwaytis of Special Collections/University Archives.

As sponsor chair of the Clarks Summit Centennial Celebration, Annette describes the sponsored pole flags that include the centennial’s logo and sponsors’ names.  The twenty-two flags will be displayed throughout the borough for the duration of the year and are available for sponsorship at the cost of $100 each.

For more information, visit the Clark’s Summit Centennial official website or view the complete article in The Abington Journal.